GlobalGiving Feedback Fund Posts

How Students with Dreams are Learning to Become Leaders

How Students with Dreams are Learning to Become Leaders

Art and Global Health Center Africa (AGHCA) is a recipient of GlobalGiving’s 2015 Feedback Fund. Recently, they shared these insights with us.

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Our Students With Dreams (SWD) program provides leadership training, mentorship, and seed funding to teams of college students to address challenges they identify in their communities in Malawi. We believe financial skills are critical. We teach our young leaders how to develop cost-effective, high-impact solutions from limited resources. In 2015 and 2016 we gathered feedback to better support them and the communities they serve.

We used several surveys about:

  • Dreamers’ experiences in the program.
  • Their self-assessment of their leadership and financial skills.
  • Their recommendations on how to improve the program. This included a focus group.

Binaytara: Feedback on Hospice Care in Nepal

Binaytara: Feedback on Hospice Care in Nepal

 Binaytara is a recipient of our 2015 Feedback Fund. Recently, they shared these insights with us.

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Even though the Binaytara Foundation has been around since 2007, we did not have any structured feedback loops in place until 2015. We relied on our partners and volunteers to give us informal feedback verbally or via email, and then made changes to our projects based on that feedback. In 2015 we started a feedback system, with help from GlobalGiving’s Feedback Fund.

CACE: Learning How to Ask Clear Questions

CACE: Learning How to Ask Clear Questions

Center for Amazon Community Ecology (CACE) is a recipient of our 2015 Feedback Fund. Recently they shared these insights with us.

We promote conservation and sustainable livelihoods by building stronger communities in the Peruvian Amazon. The Fund allowed us to ask local artisans we work with about their economic realities and dreams. Along the way, we learned how to ask these questions better, with these insights:

Phrase questions around peoples’ normal frame of reference

We initially thought that since most people do not keep any records about their earnings or expenses, we would get the most accurate responses by asking people to provide monthly “averages” for certain sources of income or types of things they paid for. In practice, artisans had the best recall when asked about the previous six months of economic activity combined.

How a Village in India Taught their Local Government to Listen

How a Village in India Taught their Local Government to Listen

Sarathi Development Foundation is a recipient of our 2015 Feedback Fund. They recently shared these insights with us.

Jamalpur is a small village of 70 families in Uttar Pradesh, India. No one there has a toilet. This is the story of their year-long struggle to get more resources from the government. It is a good illustration of the power of persistence and the role that a NGO can play in facilitating feedback loops.

Their village was not invited to be part of the annual government planning process in 2015, and so they were offered anything they wanted. The women self-help group there worked with our trained volunteers on a community goal. In August of 2015 they decided to put toilets in every house and eliminate open defecation.

The women and our volunteers visited government authorities and put their request in writing. Why should they be denied assistance, just because their village was overlooked by the government planners?

Government authorities were impressed with their collective request. They assured them the government would do something.

CACE: When the people you serve start wanting something else

CACE: When the people you serve start wanting something else

Center for Amazon Community Ecology (CACE) is a recipient of our 2015 Feedback Fund. Recently they shared these insights with us.

Angelina family artisans 450 pxWe promote conservation and sustainable livelihoods by building stronger communities in the Peruvian Amazon. The Fund allowed us to ask local artisans we work with in the Ampiyacu about their economic realities and dreams. How does making more crafts help them achieve their goals?

In 2015, we sent Peruvian videographer Tulio Davila to talk with 18 artisans over two weeks. He asked about:

  • sources of family income
  • expenses
  • assets
  • education
  • personal and family goals
  • handicraft production

What we learned:

Income range, dependency

We have a better sense of the upper and lower range of income in the village and how important selling crafts is to many families. CACE appears to be the major craft buyer from some artisans but a minor one for others.

Our goals reflect their goals

We had assumed artisans wanted to sell more. We asked them to describe their goals for one year and five years and set personal craft production targets. They showed us how many more crafts our organizations would need to sell if artisans met their goals.