Press Release: GlobalGiving to Hold Its First Summit on Social Media & Online Giving

Posted by Alexis Nadin on June 11th, 2014

GlobalGiving, the organization behind charitable giving websites GlobalGiving.org and GlobalGiving.co.uk, will hold its Summit on Social Media & Online Giving on July 1-2, 2014 in New Delhi, India. The Summit is produced in partnership with Social Media for Nonprofits, the premiere global event series on social media for social good.

The first-ever, two-day in-person event from GlobalGiving will bring together representatives from global technology services and leading South Asian NGOs to share insights, trends, and best practices for effectively engaging supporters and donors online. Fundraisers, executive directors, program managers, and communications staff from more than 100 organizations are expected to attend.

Confirmed speakers at the 2104 Summit on Social Media & Online Giving include:

See the complete agenda here.

India’s NGO community plays a large and active role in social change in India and around the world. More than 120 Indian organizations are actively fundraising on the website and more and more organizations are joining GlobalGiving every year. The 2014 Summit on Social Media & Online Giving is an opportunity to provide hands-on training to GlobalGiving’s existing partners and to introduce online tools like GlobalGiving to organizations that are interested in the fundraising platform. GlobalGiving is excited to host its first event of this kind in New Delhi.

“India’s NGO community already has the passion, creativity and people to tackle the extraordinary needs of its local communities,” said GlobalGiving’s Chief Program Officer John Hecklinger. “With this Summit we’re bringing some of the best online tools and smartest practices into the mix.”

Since it was founded in 2002, GlobalGiving has enabled more than 4,000 nonprofit organizations to access technology, training, and visibility to raise funds for more than 9,000 projects in 144 countries. In January, the Washington, DC-based organization announced it had reached $100 million in total donations providing through its platform.

The event will take place at Habitat World at the India Habitat Centre. Staff from GlobalGiving partner NGOs and other nonprofit organizations are encouraged to attend. Regular registration is Rs. 4,500 with discounts provided to organizations that are members of GlobalGiving.

The 2014 Summit on Social Media & Online Giving is generously sponsored by Ford Motor Company Fund.

For more information about the 2014 Summit on Social Media & Online Giving, visit: www.globalgiving.org/summit-2014/

register_now

About GlobalGiving

GlobalGiving is a registered nonprofit organization with the mission of catalyzing a global market for ideas, information, and money that democratizes aid and philanthropy. Its online fundraising platform, GlobalGiving.org, is creating new possibilities for everyday philanthropists, effective nonprofits, and innovative companies around the world. For more information about GlobalGiving, visit: http://www.globalgiving.org/

About Social Media for Nonprofits

Social Media for Nonprofits is a nonprofit committed to providing nonprofits quality and accessible education on leveraging the power of social media for social good. We are the only series in the world dedicated to Social Media for Social Change. We provide capacity building training to nonprofits in this area with programs focused on fundraising, awareness, and advocacy.

 

Vijana Amani Pamoja’s Learning Journey

Posted by John Hecklinger on May 16th, 2014
VAP Training Session

Nancy Njeri (VAP Program Director), Zipporah Sangiluh (GlobalGiving Storytelling Coordinator), and Enouce Ndeche (VAP Founder and Executive Director)

At GlobalGiving we get excited when we see an organization coming up with new attempts to address real problems that the community itself has identified.   Generally, GlobalGiving believes that this spontaneous generation of possible solutions is what’s missing in how development generally happens.  We get excited when we can observe an organization evolving solutions over time after listening to the people it serves, acting on that feedback, learning from the results, and repeating the process.

In May of 2010, I visited a great organization in Kenya called Vijana Amani Pamoja (VAP) which means “Youth Together in Peace” in Swahili.  It started as a football club in 2003 and has evolved into an instrument for social change.  We originally met VAP through a Nike-sponsored sports for social change network and conference held in Nairobi in 2007.  VAP works with youth in the Eastlands area of Nairobi, which can get pretty rough.  Eastlands is home to a large community of Somali refugees, and has been a fertile recruiting ground for terrorist groups linked with the Somali Al Shabaab organization.  Eastlands is the perfect place for a great organization to make a huge impact on a very vulnerable youth population.  VAP uses soccer as a tool to engage youth in programs relating to life skills, HIV/AIDS, and reproductive health with a focus on helping vulnerable girls.

My visit in 2010 was in connection with VAP’s participation in GlobalGiving’s Storytelling Project.  We approached them to be a part of our early experimentation, and they were enthusiastic and engaged.  I attended a session for coaches getting trained up in collecting short narratives from program participants.  In the end VAP collected over 100 stories from girls participating in their program.  From those stories VAP learned that sexual violence was an even more prevalent problem than they had imagined and that girls were willing to talk about their experiences.  In response, VAP launched a program to enhance girls’ self-esteem – the Miss Mrembo Tournament – a combination soccer tournament, beauty pageant, and educational program involving peer educators and counselors from Nairobi Women’s hospital.

VAP continues to demonstrate its commitment to learning and improvement.  I recently became aware of the scorecard VAP created to monitor and evaluate its programs.   They worked with an umbrella organization called Grassroots Soccer to establish a monitoring and evaluation framework to capture changes in behavior among the girls participating in their programs.  The scorecard is engineered in Salesforce and captures metrics in a way that helps VAP move from counting outputs to capturing outcomes.

VAP continues to evolve its programs based on feedback and community needs.  They launched a vocational training program in 2013 to help girls obtain marketable hairdressing and beauty skills and they consistently look for ways to validate their approach.  In a recent newsletter to donors VAP described how it is linking up with researchers evaluating the potential of HIV oral self-testing.  Yet again, VAP is demonstrating its commitment to experimentation and learning.  They are considering including HIV oral self-testing in its annual Kick & Test soccer event and they are willing to work with evaluators to maximize learning and to share results.

Currently VAP works with more than 2,700 participants in its HIV “Skillz” program and 1,200 girls in its “Mrembo” program.  They have participated in various funding opportunities with GlobalGiviung, but they are still a small organization with modest funding needs.  GlobalGiving’s existing Partner Rewards system ranks them as Leader – one step below the top ranking of Superstar.  In GlobalGiving’s new Effectiveness Dashboard, VAP ranks very high in Listening, Acting, and Learning.  In early 2015, GlobalGiving will link these two ranking systems in a way that creates more visibility and status for organizations like VAP that demonstrate a commitment to the Listen, Act, Learn, Repeat cycle.

GlobalGiving has helped VAP at various points in its learning journey, but VAP independently seeks out learning opportunities on its own.  VAP provides a great example of the organizational behaviors that GlobalGiving believes will ultimately lead to better human outcomes.  While we don’t know for sure what kind of lasting change VAP causes in its community, we do know that more and more individuals are being helped with issues that the individuals themselves have identified as problematic, and those efforts link nicely with what development experts believe to be key levers for improving human development.   GlobalGiving is placing its bet on organizations like VAP to be the drivers of real change.

Improve your fundraising with GlobalGiving Analytics

Posted by Alexis Nadin on May 15th, 2014

You asked and we delivered! Based on your feedback, GlobalGiving has developed the Analytics Dashboard, a new feature designed to provide insight into your GlobalGiving project and report activity. Check it out here to see how many people are visiting your project pages, reading your project reports, and donating.

Why is data important?

Your organization is providing lifesaving services and advocating for world-changing causes and I bet you’re doing it all with limited staff and financial resources. That’s why data is so crucial to your organization’s decision making! Data allows you to determine how to best allocate your precious time and resources. It makes it possible to maximize the effectiveness of your communications and campaigns to generate more funds for your work. With data, you can set more accurate fundraising goals and measure progress so you can maximize funds to support your mission.

Analytics Dashboard Guide – Visit your Analytics Dashboard here.

Analytics 2The Analytics Dashboard includes the following information:

Date Range: Data is available since the beginning of your account with GlobalGiving! Use the slider to set the date range that you would like to view.

Number of donations: The total number of donations received during the selected period of time.

Number of pageviews: The total number of times your project(s) was loaded on a device during the specified period of time.

Average time on page: The average amount of time that a user spent on your project page(s) before clicking away. Average based on pageviews during the specified period of time.

Number of donations: All the donations received in the selected period of time. Read the rest of this entry »

Tell your story from a better point of view – theirs

Posted by Marc Maxson on May 9th, 2014

give_now

GlobalGiving has always required its partner organizations to send progress reports to their donors. And for good reason: sometimes these donors click the “give’ button when they read a compelling update. In fact, between 2007 and 2014, global givers gave $1,077,000 through progress reports.

gg_storytelling

Because of my work on the GlobalGiving Storytelling project, I’ve been long interested in whether I could write a computer algorithm that would be able to tell the difference between a “good” story and a “poor” one. Last week I figured out how to detect a story’s point of view, and it appears to have a huge effect on whether people are inspired to give.

It turns out that there are 7 points of view that a story, narrative, or progress report could have:

These range from cool to warm, from personal to collective. But which of these is points of view is best if the goal is to get people to give again?

The Results

I ran the “point of view” detector on all GlobalGiving progress reports to date and all of our East African community effort stories. For contrast, I included 812 examples of great storytelling from Cowbird.com, which has been emailing me a “story of the day” for the last two years. These Cowbird stories are manually curated, and thus they reflect what points of view people find most emotionally compelling.

How common is each point of view?

The fraction of reports with each perspective is shown in the box. Multiply by 100 to get percents.

GlobalGiving Project Reports (N=25,337) East African Community Stories (N=61,946) Cowbird.com Story of the day (N=812)
fourth “this org” 0.35 fourth “this org” 0.29 first singular “I” 0.514
first plural “we” 0.268 third plural “they” 0.197 third singular “he” 0.112
third plural “we” 0.126 None (no pronouns) 0.18 fourth “it” 0.108
third singular “he” 0.098 third singular “he” 0.117 None (no pronouns) 0.078
second “you” 0.069 first plural “we” 0.084 first plural “we” 0.07
first singular “I” 0.046 first singular “I” 0.078 second “you” 0.057
None 0.04 mixed 0.049 third plural 0.033
mixed 0.003 second 0.007 mixed 0.028

People who talked about community activities in our East African storytelling project tended to focus on “it” stories, mentioning “this organization” much more than any person, including themselves. Project leaders on GlobalGiving were even more likely to talk about themselves. 51% of Cowbird’s “story of the day” collection is told primarily from a first person perspective.

Only 5% of all reports told their story using a “mixed” perspective. An example of a “mixed” perspective is where the organization reminds the reader who they are and why what they do matters, then shifts to letting a beneficiary tell his or her own story (an “I” story), then wraps up by acknowledging that donors helped make this happen (a “you” story).

Example:

We’re gearing up to head to Uganda! By the time you get this, we’ll be gone. Thanks to your support we will be taking additional fabric that they can not purchase there (and exploring further with dignitaries how to mnake that fabric available in Uganda). We’ll distribute kits…

You should see the girl’s faces when they receive kits. I hope you can come someday. They are so grateful. The last time we were there a girl in Gulu, Uganda said when she was asked if her kit would really change anything, “I will no longer have to fear.” Thanks to you more girls will have more dignity, more safety, less distraction at school and yes, less fear. For that matter, without your support, she might not have been able to stay in class at all. It never ceases to amaze me that such a simple, direct solution improves so much for girls around the globe. Thank you for being an important part of the solution.

The “mixed perspective” does best:

 Effectiveness of project reports in raising money None third plural (they) fourth (this org, it) first plural (we) third singular (he) first singular (I) second (you) mixed
Total $$ raised 78 220 267 292 302 329 421 567
Donations per report 0.9 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.5 3.8 4.8 6.5
Average $$ per donation 24.9 46.7 53.9 55.8 52.4 51.9 58.0 60.5
Number of reports (N) 611 2519 7413 5881 2184 1056 1449 98

 

Notes: N = 25,337 published reports. Data includes cases where nobody gave any money after reading reports (23% of the total).

Project reports with a “mixed” perspective raise 111% more money and get 160% more donations than reports with “fourth” org-centric point of view.

The Gap

There is a huge gap between how most organizations speak and what donors respond to. The green line near the center shows what fraction of stories have each of 6 points of view. The blue and red lines represent more donations and more money raised from a “you”, “I” and “you and I” mixed perspective:

donations-volume-size-vs-pov-projrept

Other factors:

  • High GlobalGiving staff progress report ratings correlate with more money raised. What we consider a five-star report raises more than the four, which raises more than a three, etc.
  • Women who write progress reports raise 30% more money, 30% more donations, and 5% larger donations than men do. (We inferred male/female from author names using www.i-gender.com)
  • It’s the setup, not the ask: Most reports include an explicit plea for more funding, with words like give, support, giving, or donate. Including this “ask” in your report helps donations a little, but far less than including a story from the people you are trying to help. Donors can see the big shiny orange give button and know what to do without being told.

Convinced yet? If so, then maybe you understand why GlobalGiving has been so effusive about organizations that listen to their communities and share this feedback through our story-centered-learning paradigm. The smartest way to fix your point of view is to talk to others and share their stories, instead of only writing from your perspective. Not only are reports with a “mixed” perspective better for the community (who have very few ways to speak to the people who influence money), they also are better for organizations (because GlobalGiving donors clearly appear to be listening).

Try before you publish!

I created a simple demo tool. Paste your text into the box and it will analyze your point of view: djotjog.com/c/report/.

This is just one more way that Globalgiving helps organizations listen, act, and learn  more, faster. In fact we’re giving away money through our storytelling fund to encourage everyone to do this.

How to Collect Stories from Your Community

Posted by Alexis Nadin on May 5th, 2014

Last week, GlobalGivng staff Britt Lake, Marc Maxson, and Sarah Hennessy held a webinar on the recently announced Storytelling Fund. We reviewed some definitions and background on feedback, learned more about using the Storytelling Tool, and finally learning about applying to the Storytelling Fund.

Watch the recording here.

What is Feedback? Why is it important?

Collecting feedback is an important way for you to gather information from your community to improve the services you offer to your beneficiaries or constituents. Closing feedback loops helps you move beyond simply collecting data in community surveys- by acting on that information, and communicating those actions back to your constituents, you can engage your community in a more impactful cycle of learning and improving your work. You’ve heard us talking about listening, acting, and learning- closing a feedback loop helps your organization do all three.

Collecting and acting on feedback from your constituents is analogous to conducting consumer satisfaction surveys in a for-profit setting. These surveys help businesses measure their performance and adjust their activities accordingly. The same principle applies to collecting feedback from the community in which you work. This type of “bottom-up” information helps you adjust your programming to ensure that you are meeting the needs of your community, and amplifying your impact as much as possible.

There are a variety of effective ways to collect and act on feedback- and, with the new GG Effectiveness Dashboard, we are giving you credit for doing it! One method of collecting feedback from your community is through the GG Storytelling Tool. This tool guides you through the collection of stories from your community about the issues that they find most pressing, and then helps you analyze that qualitative data in order to help you discover how best adjust your programming. In short, this tool helps you make sense of a large amount of qualitative information (stories) by turning it into quantitative information (like more traditional M&E approaches).

What is the GG Storytelling Tool?

So how does the tool work? Here’s what the Storytelling Cycle looks like:

Storytelling lifecycle

Find information on the tool, as well as a step-by-step guide, here.

After building your storytelling form online, you can train a group of volunteers to take those forms into your community (using a computer or via paper) and collect stories. We call these volunteers “scribes”. We have found that using volunteers from your organization, rather than staff, can help in obtaining the least biased and most helpful stories. Remember, you should not just collect stories from your direct beneficiaries, but also look to your community at large for feedback. While it may seem like your direct beneficiaries would give you the best information about your programming, the most useful feedback will actually be both from those closest to your work, as well as those tangentially affected: parents, neighbors, and friends of your direct beneficiaries, who are all, in one way or another, effected by your organization. Read the rest of this entry »

Announcing the GG Buddy Program

Posted by Katherine Sammons on May 5th, 2014

 

We have been hearing feedback from Project Leaders, saying that they are experiencing fundraising fatigue. Fundraising can be hard and tiring, so we are looking for ways to help. GlobalGiving is excited to introduce the GG Buddy Program to help your organization get ready for the Partner Rewards Bonus Day on July 16th! The GG Buddy Program is meant to link your organization up with another nonprofit hosted on GlobalGiving in order to provide you with peer support while prepping for the July 16th Partner Rewards Bonus Day. After linking up your organization, we will ask that you and your GG Buddy create a communication calendar, and we will provide you with a helpful fundraising worksheet. Apply by May 26, 2014.

Partner Rewards Bonus Day Highlights                       GG partner Rewards    

Date: July 16, 2014

Start Time: 9:00  am EDT (time in your city)

End Time: 11:59 pm EDT (time in your city)

Matching Funds: $120,000

Matching Percent:  A project’s match is based upon the organization’s Partner Rewards Level. Partners will be matched 30%, Leaders will be matched 40%, and Superstars will be matched 50%.

Application Highlights

Application: Click here

Application Due Date: May 26, 2014

GG Buddy Match Notification: June 2, 2014

If you have questions about the program or application please email ksammons@globalgiving.org. Thank you!

Apply for Professional Storytelling Support

Posted by Katherine Sammons on May 5th, 2014

 

GlobalGiving is excited to offer a new storytelling support program! GlobalGiving’s Angela Wu will visit an organization in August to help capture stories of impact through photographs, video, or short narratives. Angela is a professional photographer and has her own photography company, Mustard Tights. Stories, whether visual, oral, or written, capture an audience and succinctly show the work and impact of your organization. Storytelling isn’t just about posting a photo on Facebook, rather, storytelling is intentional and creates lasting connections. Click here to learn three reasons why nonprofits should practice storytelling. Learn more about the application below and apply today!

Angela Wu

Angela Wu

Application Highlights          

Due Date:  June 13, 2014

Application: Click here 

Selection Date: July 3, 2014

 

Please send questions about the application or program  to ksammons@globalgiving.org. Thank you!

 

Online Fundraising Academy: Fundraising Evaluation and Analysis

Posted by Alexis Nadin on May 1st, 2014

kaylanKaylan Christofferson, GlobalGiving’s Business Intelligence Analyst, joined us for the final session of the 2014 Online Fundraising Academy to talk about Fundraising Evaluation and Analysis. Kaylan and her team support GlobalGiving in financial goal setting and benchmarking and lead the charge in tracking annual progress and evaluating year-end results. She is responsible for compiling a weekly analysis of site activity and donations. She discussed the value of goal-setting and ongoing monitoring of fundraising activities and provided concrete tips to get started!

Session recording: https://www.anymeeting.com/WebConference-beta/RecordingDefault.aspx?c_psrid=EF56DA888348  

Session notes:

Fundraising Analysis

WHO should be using data to drive fundraising strategy?

  • If your organization has limited resources and if your organization is working for an important cause (which should be everyone!), you should be looking at data.
  • With limited resources, you need to use resources as efficiently as possible. 
  • If working for important cause, data can help to maximize effectiveness to generate more funds for your work

AdWords-Best-Practice_Loves-DataWHY should we use data?

  • Data analysis is using the numbers to help guide your actions, set fundraising goals, and measure progress so you can maximize funds to support your mission
  • When resources are limited, using your time efficiently and effectively is even more important!
  • Example: Look at time spent on different fundraising activities to compare how effective each activity is. Can see that board outreach is more time-efficient. This is not saying that you should only focus on your most efficient activity, but this can help you be more efficient and help you stay on track with your fundraising goals.

Fundraising Activity

Time Spent on Activity

Total Donations from Activity

Email outreach

10 hours

$1,000

Board outreach

3 hours

$1,000

Social media

5 hours

$300

WHEN should you use data to set goals?

  1. Before a particular fundraising campaign or event
  2. Annual strategic planning and throughout the year

Example 1: Set a goal before a particular campaign/event – Bonus Day

How much money can your organization raise on Bonus Day? Read the rest of this entry »

Online Fundraising Academy: Donor-Centered Retention Strategy

Posted by Alexis Nadin on April 24th, 2014

CCA_Brochure_6We were fortunate to have David Schaeffer, the Vice President of Development at the Children’s Cancer Association, join us for the eighth session of the Online Fundraising Academy! David has close to twenty years of fundraising experience, having worked in development for multiple organizations including Make A Wish Foundation, the American Cancer Society, and now, the Children’s Cancer Association. He is joining the Academy for the second year in a row to share his organization’s donor-centered approach to retention.

Watch the session recording here.

Session notes:

Children’s Cancer Association – A nonprofit based in Portland that provides support and joy to children with cancer and their families

Donor Retention – measure of how many donors continue to donate to your organization

  • High retention rate means you have a strong base of donors – the longer donors give, the more likely they will continue to give
  • Low retention rate means you have to keep finding new donors – difficult and expensive, not an effective use of money or time
  • This study Fundraising Effectiveness Project (FEP) found that:
    • Between 2006 and 2011, donor retention rates decreased by about 10%
    • Overall donor retention was 39% in 2012, down from 41% in 2011
    • Repeat donor retention was 61%
    • New donor retention was only 23%
    • Attrition eating into ability to retain donors – For every 100 donors gained, organizations lost 105 donors

Some causes of donor attrition

  • They have no memory of supporting the organization – make sure they know where they’re money is going; connect back to the mission
  • The organization asked for an inappropriate amount – create gift arrays starting with your organization’s average donation amount (the amount your donors like to give)
  • They were not reminded to give again – reach out to people at least 2x year to give them a chance to give
  • They didn’t feel connected – help them understand why they give
  • The organization didn’t tell them how donations were used

Ways to increase donor retention

  • Know who donors are, metrics, donor analysis for communications
  • 91 days is the lapsed period – if you don’t reach out to donors 91 days after their initial donation, you’ll most likely lose them. Need to acknowledge them right away.
  • Personalize your communication – build one-on-one relationships
  • Show donors how their funds help you achieve your mission
  • Send thank you letters
    • Be brief, personal
    • Include a story of a beneficiary, how donor dollars are being used, and give them a chance to contact you
    • Don’t ask for another gift – donor may not see it as a sincere thank you
  • Segment your communication to donors
    • Send specific communications to certain groups of donors (making sure it’s personalized)
    • Segment by past giving, zip code, age – send emails to people it’s most relevant to
  • Create a donor stewardship moves management plan

CCA Acknowledgment Standards
Read the rest of this entry »

Announcing the Storytelling Fund!

Posted by Alexis Nadin on April 17th, 2014

gg-storytelling-logo-croppedHere at GlobalGiving, we believe that good feedback loops are crucial to becoming an effective development organization.  In order to solve the world’s biggest problems, we must be Listening to constituents, peers, and experts; Acting on what we hear; and Learning from those experiences.   We want to help you to become more effective through this process as well!

We just launched our Effectiveness Dashboard to help you track and improve your own progress along this cycle.  One way your organization can earn points is by collecting feedback from those who benefit from your services.  You can’t listen to your community, act on what you hear, and learn from those experiences without first collecting feedback from the community where you do your work.

GlobalGiving’s Storytelling methodology asks community members:Tell us about a time when a person or an organization tried to change something in your community.”  Storytellers then answer a few basic questions about their story, and the tools we’ve developed can help you analyze those stories to inform your programs and help you better understand your community.

Storytelling Fund

To make this process a little easier, GlobalGiving is offering technical support and up to $2,000 to help your organization collect the feedback it needs through our Storytelling methodologyAs an added bonus, you’ll also earn points on your Effectiveness Dashboard!   The deadline to apply is May 17.

Storytelling Webinar

To help you develop a plan for collecting feedback within your community and to provide you with more details about the new Community Feedback Fund, GlobalGiving will be hosting a webinar on Wednesday, April 30 at 9 am EDT (Find this time in your city) and 3 pm EDT (Find this time in your city). Sign up for the webinar here.

Want to apply?  Here are the Terms and Conditions:

  • Only GlobalGiving Partners, Leaders, and Superstars with active projects on GlobalGiving.org are eligible to apply.
  • Organizations may apply for a maximum of $2,000 in funds to be used to cover costs specific to story collecting, and must include a draft budget for the support sought.
  • Organizations receiving the funds must use the GlobalGiving storytelling tool to collect these community stories.  All stories become part of the GlobalGiving’s open source database.
  • Storytelling Funds can be used to cover incremental costs for collecting stories, including:
    • Printing or copying the story form
    • Volunteer/scribe/storyteller incentives (but not regular staff salary)
    • Translation and transcription of the forms or stories
    • Workshop space rental
  • Funds will be sent after the first 100 stories are collected and entered into the Storytelling database.  It is the responsibility of the organization to notify GlobalGiving when the stories are collected and to submit receipts of the costs.
  • The first 100 stories must be collected before September 1, 2014 or GlobalGiving reserves the right to revoke the funds.
  • In addition to funding, recipients selected for this opportunity also receive:
    • A pre-collection call with a GlobalGiving storytelling expert to help design your story collection;
    • Participation in a training webinar on using the tool and analyzing the data for an unlimited number of staff;
    • Ongoing support from GlobalGiving storytelling experts while the initial storytelling is conducted;
    • One round of post-collection analysis.
  • The deadline to apply is May 17, 2014.