Archive for the ‘Fundraising Tips’ Category

 

October 15, 2014 Bonus Day Tips and Tricks

Posted by Katherine Sammons on September 17th, 2014

Last week GlobalGiving held a webinar on the terms and conditions for the upcoming October 15th Bonus Day. We also went over a Bonus Day strategy, that will help make Bonus Day a successful fundraising day for your organization. We’re offering a 30% match on all donations up to $1,000 per donor per project, while funds remain. There is $75,000 available in matching and matching begins at 9:00 am EDT and lasts until funds run out or 11:59 pm EDT.  There is also $2,000 in bonus prizes available!

The Benefits of Bonus Day

Bonus Days are a great way to re-energize your donor base and grow your network of supporters. Bonus Days allow your organization to fundraise around a time-bound campaign. Matching funds gained on Bonus Day are just the icing on the cake. Bonus Days should be looked at as a reason to ask your donors to give. They allow your organization to create a sense of urgency; donors must give now.

Bonus Day Terms & Conditions

For full Bonus Day terms and conditions click here.

Bonus Day Strategy – Let’s Gets Started! 

Use the timeline and tasks below to create a Bonus Day strategy for your organization to use in order to have a successful Bonus Day.

Tips and Tricks – Week 1, Sept. 22-28

  • Bonus Day Funding Goal (excluding matching funds and bonus prizes): ­____________
  • How many donors do you need to reach your funding goal?: ________________

Tips & Tricks – Week 2, Sept. 29 Oct. 5: Identify supporters and get feedback

  • Identify potential donors, such as board members, former volunteers and interns, and friends/family
  • Identify donor captains. Donor captains are responsible for raising a funding goal on the day of Bonus Day. For example, a donor captain may be a former intern that is excited about your work and pledges to raise $300 from 20 donors for your project. Donor captains help your organization grow its network of supporters.
  • Contact donor captains. Let them know why you are asking for their help and tell them how they can help. Remember your donor captains are persons that care about your organization, the work you are doing, and most importantly they care about you (the number 1 reason why people give is because someone they know and trust asked them too).

Tips & Tricks – Week 3, Oct. 6 Oct. 12: Begin Communication with supporters and write communications for Bonus Day

  • Send an email to your network letting them know that on Oct. 15th you will be asking them a favor. Tell them to look out for an email. Include a quote from a beneficiary, a story about one of your beneficiaries, or an update on how your project is doing. You want to make sure that you remind them about the great work your organization is doing, and why their donation will make a difference. Include the world clock announcer, so they know that time Bonus Day starts in their location, but do not include the link to give.
  • Call your major donors and supporters to let them know about the Bonus Day and that they should be on the look for an email from you about how to give on Oct. 15th.
  • Put together messaging for your organization to use on Bonus Day. This should include the following:

–A project report for GlobalGiving. Submit your project report to GlobalGiving before Bonus Day, and request that it be sent out on Oct. 15th at 9 am EDT (Bonus Day start time). In your project report include an update about your project, a quote from a beneficiary, and/or story of one of your beneficiaries. Also, don’t forget to include a call to action for donors to give on Bonus Day. Your project report should inspire them to give.

–Write and send messaging for your donor captains to use for Bonus Day asks. You want to make sure that assisting your organization is easy for them, and that they are sharing the correct information. Include a template email, sample tweets, and sample Facebook posts, if relevant.

Tips & Tricks – Week 4, Oct. 13 -19: Bonus Day week & thank you notes

  • Day before Bonus Day: Send out an email to supporters the day before Bonus Day letting them know that there is an opportunity for them to have their donation matched. Let them know when Bonus Day starts. Include the world clock event announcer, so they know what time Bonus Day starts in their location. Do not include a link to your project page or how to give quite yet.
  • Bonus Day: When Bonus Day begins at 9 am EDT, send out an email to your supporters letting them know that you are now asking for the favor, and why. Include directions on how to give, by including a direct link to your project page. Do not send donors to GlobalGiving’s homepage. Please send donors directly to your project page in order to minimize confusion and clicks.

Day after Bonus Day: Make sure you thank your donors in a timely manner by using GlobalGiving’s thank you note feature.  Click here to learn more about the thank you note feature

Listen, Act, Learn. Repeat. 

We know your time and resources are valuable. We want to help you be as effective as possible with those resources, and we’ve seen that effectiveness is driven by a cycle of progress that involves listening, acting, and learning (and repeating — doing it all again). Think about the questions below in order to test how your strategy worked.

  • LISTEN: You just read tips for a creating a successful October 15th Bonus Day.
  • ACT: What is one way you are going to fundraise for Bonus Day?
  • LEARN: How will you know whether your fundraising strategy worked? What results will you look for in order to measure success?

Protect Your Organization Against Fraud

Posted by Alexis Nadin on August 24th, 2014

Online fundraising is a powerful tool for good! But, unfortunately, as online giving becomes more common, nonprofits are becoming targets for online scams using stolen credit cards and fake checks. GlobalGiving has developed robust systems to protect our partners from fraudulent donations but we believe there’s more we can do to raise awareness about potential risks within the nonprofit community. On Wednesday, August 20th, we hosted a webinar to shed light on the different types of fraudulent activity that we have encountered, to share the mechanisms that we have put in place to protect our partners, and to propose steps your organization can take to safeguard against these scams.

The webinar was hosted by Nick Hamlin, GlobalGiving’s Business Intelligence Analyst, who leads the charge in identifying irregular activity and reversing fraudulent donations. We were also joined by Rebecca Davis, the Founder of Rebecca Davis Dance Company (RDDC), who offered to share her organization’s experience with fraud to help other organizations identify risky activity.

You can watch a recording of the webinar here. (You can earn a “Listen” point on your effectiveness dashboard by watching this recording!) Check out a brief summary is provided below.

Why worry about fraud?

Non-profits rely on trust, time, and funding to accomplish their mission but fraud can compromise all three and reduce your impact!

Stolen credit cardsFour Common Types of Fraudulent Activity:

Stolen Credit Card Testing

  • What happens?
    • Fraudsters obtain lists of stolen credit card numbers
    • Before using them, they need to test if they work
    • Make a small donation on GG before larger purchases elsewhere
    • Small transactions (usually 10-50 USD)
    • Donors you’ve never heard of before
    • Strange email addresses
  • How is GG protecting my organization from this?
    • Our system rejects many stolen cards automatically
    • Automatic regular scans to identify donations that succeeded
    • Preemptive reversals and notifications to you
    • Known fraudsters are no longer allowed to use GG

Reversal

Fake Large Donor (more…)

Fundraising Experiments using your Analytics Dashboard

Posted by Alexis Nadin on July 28th, 2014

Earlier this year, GlobalGiving announced a new Analytics Dashboard– a feature designed to give you insight into your GlobalGiving project and report activity. Nick Hamlin, GlobalGiving’s Business Intelligence Analytst, joined us to talk about ways that organizations can use this tool to analyze their GlobalGiving activity and design experiments to improve communications and fundraising efforts.

Watch the webinar recording here. Check out a summary of the session below.

Why should you care about data?

Have you ever said to yourself “There’s never enough time, money, or resources to have the impact we’d like!” Well, with good data you’ll be able to make the greatest impact with the resources you DO have!

Running a non-profit organization is like driving a car

You only have one tank of fuel and limited time to arrive at destination. Without a map, you find yourself driving around lost and in search of your destination. That wastes time and gas! With a map, you have a clear path to get where you need to go as quickly and efficiently as possible!

Data is like a map. It will help your organization work effectively and use their resources efficiently. It can help you see where you need to go, how to get there as quickly as you can, and help you use your resources as efficiently as possible.

Use your Analytics Dashboard to analyze your fundraisingAnalytics dashboard link

Access your Analytics Dashboard from the Project Entry System dashboard. See a complete summary of the information that is available in the Analytics Dashboard here. Visit your Analytics Dashboard here.

Design an experiment to identify areas for increased potential

  1. Identify a specific metric that you would like to improve—time on project page, number or project reports opened, etc.
  2. Formulate a hypothesis using an “if à then”  statement
  3. Make one specific, isolated change to your project or your next report on GlobalGiving– such as replacing the main photo, changing the title, or trying something new with the subject line. It is best to make these changes one at a time, so you can isolate what factor is responsible for an increase or decrease in your metrics.

Example 1

Hypothesis: If I make a change to my project page, visitors will stay on it longer.

Steps:

  1. Make a change to your project page. Try not to do this during other campaigns so you can make sure that the difference in results you gather are due to that change and not due to the campaign.
  2. Use the slider to compare the average time on the page before you made the change to after you made the change by examining different time periods

Example: Make a change to project page on February 14th

Result: You can see that the average time on page has increased after you made the change – showing that the change you made was successful at holding donor’s attention for longer!

example 1Example 2

Hypothesis: If we do an outreach campaign via Facebook, more people will donate to our project through Facebook than in the past.

Steps:

  1. Start reaching out to supporters on Facebook
  2. Use the slider to compare your top donation sources before and after the campaign. Does the proportion of Facebook donors increase?

Example: Same time of year, different strategy

Result: You can see that the number of donors who arrived at your project page by Facebook has increased by a significant amount. Reaching out to people by Facebook was a success!

example 2Example 3

Hypothesis: My last report didn’t get a very good open rate. If I change the tone of my subject line, more people will open my report.

Steps:

  1. When you send your next report, include a subject line that gives people a concrete or intriguing reason to open your report.
  2. Compare the open rates for each report as a percentage of how many people received the message to see if your subject line helped.

Example: Let’s try a better subject line

Result: You can see that the open rate nearly doubled with the more exciting, more informative subject line! A future experiment could be trying to increase the click through rate by offering multiple links to the GlobalGiving page throughout the email, or by making the report as engaging and inspiring as possible.

example 3Got ideas? Now it’s your turn to start creating hypotheses and experiments to improve your fundraising on GlobalGiving. Share your experiments, results, and learnings on the Project Leader Facebook group.

If you have any questions, please email us at projecthelp@globalgiving.org.

——–

Get Effectivness Points for watching this recording!

You even get credit on your Effectiveness Dashboard for listening to webinars! So everyone who listens to this webinar, even the recording of it, will receive a point for “Listen.” Again, the link to the webinar recording: https://www.anymeeting.com/WebConference-beta/RecordingDefault.aspx?c_psrid=EF58DC85834F

Day 2 Recap – Summit on Social Media and Online Giving

Posted by Alexis Nadin on July 15th, 2014
Jai Bhujwala, VP, Online & Retail Giving, GiveIndia

Jai Bhujwala, VP, Online & Retail Giving, GiveIndia

Did you miss GlobalGiving’s Summit on Social Media and Online Giving in New Delhi? Don’t worry! We’ve provided a brief recap of the second day, which focused on strategies and techniques for raising funds online. Check out the Twitter conversation and the event photos online.

Online Community & Social Fundraising: India 2.0Session Presentation

Jai Bhujwala, VP, Online & Retail Giving, GiveIndia
Fundraising has evolved with the invention of the internet. Is it no longer a one-way effort of gathering contributions by soliciting donations. Instead, Fundraising 2.0 is an effort to empower your supporters to raise funds using their networks and communities. Jai shares GiveIndia’s tips for harnessing the power of this new phenomenon to raise funds for your organization.

Corporate Engagement in India

Shefali Arora, Account Planner, Google IndiaSession Presentation

Namrata Rana, Director, FuturescapeSession Presentation

Moderator: Courtney Eskew, Senior Partner Services Associate, GlobalGiving

Panel Discussion: Corporate Engagement in India

Panel Discussion: Corporate Engagement in India

What can happen when the interests of companies and nonprofits collide? Shefali Arora shared five exciting ways that Google is working with NGOs in India and around the world including the Global Impact Awards, GooglersGive, GoogleServe, The NGO Consultant, and Google Ad Grants. Namrata Rana spoke about an exciting new law in India that requires Indian companies to donate 2% of their net profits to Indian NGOs.

Turning Volunteers into Long-Term AdvocatesSession Presentation

Vishal Talreja, CEO & Co-Founder, Dream a Dream
Dream a Dream has successfully engaged hundreds of volunteers over the past several years, including hundreds of corporate volunteers who have become lasting advocates for the organization. Vishal shared insights about the volunteer lifecycle that he has seen at Dream a Dream and provided tips for developing a volunteer engagement strategy.

Building Lasting Donor Relationships

Nandita Mishra, Director of Programs, South Asian Fund Raising Group (SAFRG) – Session Presentation

Priyanka Singh, Chief Executive, Seva Mandir – Session Presentation

Elsa Varghese, Officer – Grants and Communications, Mumbai Mobile Creches – Session Presentation

Moderator: Neeharika Tummala, India Field Representative, GlobalGiving

Attracting donors is one thing, but getting them to continue give is a whole new challenge. Panelists shared their organizations’ secrets to engaging long-term donors: developing a strong donor stewardship plan, building meaningful relationships, showing recognition and appreciation, and communicating impact regularly.

K. Thiagarajan, Agastya International Foundation on Effective Campaign Fundraising

K. Thiagarajan, Agastya International Foundation on Effective Campaign Fundraising

Effective Campaign Fundraising

K. Thiagarajan, Chief of Operations, Agastya International Foundation – Session Presentation

Vasumathi Sriganesh, Founder/CEO, QMed Knowledge Foundation – Session Presentation

Shalia Brijnath, Chairman, Aasraa Trust – Session Presentation

Moderator: Michael Gale, Senior Program Manager, GlobalGiving

These panelists have raised lakhs of rupees from one-month fundraising campaigns! Shaila Brijnath reminded us that if you don’t ask, people won’t give. She talked about the power of hard work and passion in developing a fundraising campaign. K. Thiagarajan shared how to develop a successful campaign strategy and how to leverage trusted donor relationships. Vasumathi Sriganesh wrapped up the session with a discussion about overcoming challenges in online fundraising.

How to Tell Compelling Stories OnlineSession Presentation

GlobalGiving Team at the end of the Summit

GlobalGiving Team at the end of the Summit

Kyla Johnson, Communications Associate, Educate Girls

A picture may be worth a thousand words, but a powerful story is priceless. Kyla Johnson shared how Educate Girls uses inspiring stories and reports to motivate donors to give. She provided practical tips for telling engaging stories that keep your network engaged.

Question or comments? Keep the conversation going using the hashtag #SMG14 on Twitter.

Partner Rewards Bonus Day Webinar Summary

Posted by Katherine Sammons on June 30th, 2014

On Thursday June 26th, GlobalGiving  held two webinars to prepare you all for our upcoming Partner Rewards Bonus Day! We discussed the basic Terms and Conditions, what are Partner Rewards Levels and how to find out yours, tips and tricks for succeeding in the Bonus Day, and the support GlobalGiving can provide you leading up to this event.

If you were not able to attend or you would like to listen again you can view the presentation and listen to the recording here.

Basic Bonus Day Information

This Matching Day honors all the hard work you all have put in to being Partners, Leaders, and Superstars. The amount of matching you and your organization will receive is dependent on your Partner Rewards Status. Partners will receive 30% in matching funds, Leaders will receive 40% in matching funds, and Superstars will receive 50% in matching funds. We are also excited to announce that for this Partner Rewards Bonus Day, we are adding an extra $10,000 in matching funds!  Now, the total amount of matching funds available is $130,000. We are offering a $1,000 bonus award for the project that raises the most funds and a $500 bonus award for the project that comes in second place. There’s more! We are also offering another $1,000 bonus award for most individual donors and a $500 award for the project that comes in second place. 

Terms and Conditions

  • Bonus Day begins at 9:00 am EDT on July 16th, 2014 (time in your city) and ends at 11:59 pm EDT (time in your city) on July 16th, 2014
  • There is $130,000 in matching funds available
  • Online donations of up to $1,000 per individual donor per project are eligible to be matched at 30% to 50% depending on the organization’s Partner Rewards Level.
  • Organizations ranked as Partner will have their donations matched at 30%, organizations ranked as Leader will have their donations matched at 40%, and organizations ranked as Superstar will have their donations matched at 50%.
  • The organization that raises the most donations on Bonus Day will receive an additional $1,000 from GlobalGiving. This bonus prize is determined at 11:59 pm EDT on July 16th
  • The organization comes in second place for most donations on Bonus Day will receive an additional $500 from GlobalGiving. This bonus prize is determined at 11:59 pm EDT on July 16th.
  • The organization that secures the most unique donors on Bonus Day will receive an additional $1,000 from GlobalGiving. This bonus prize is determined at 11:59 pm EDT on July 16th.
  • The organization that comes in second place for most unique donors on Bonus Day will receive an additional $500 from GlobalGiving. This bonus prize is determined at 11:59 pm EDT on July 16th.
  • Projects must be approved and live on the GlobalGiving.org website by July 14th to be eligible.
  • Only online donations (credit card or PayPal) are eligible for matching. Donations made by check or text-to-give are not eligible.
  • Donations made on globalgiving.co.uk or any GlobalGiving corporate sites including  Benevity are not eligible for matching.
  • Funds, such as  disaster funds are not eligible for matching.
  • We encourage you to get donations in early, because matching funds will likely run out before the end of the day.
  • Please note that GlobalGiving will monitor and review all donations made through this matching offer.
  • GlobalGiving maintains the right to make a final decision on all matters concerning the allocation of matching funds.
  • Please note that all donations are final. GlobalGiving cannot change the time, date, or status of a donation after it is processed for any reason.

Your Partner Rewards 

To maximize this upcoming Bonus Day as much as possible, it is important to know the ins and outs of Partner Rewards. To start, below are easy steps to finding your Partner Rewards Level:

  1. Log-in to Project Entry (PE)
  2. Access your dashboard
  3. You will see a grey box titled, “Reward Level”
  4. Click “Reward Level”

Once you complete these steps, you will see that there are different sub-categories GlobalGiving uses to determine your Partner Rewards Level. Your level is based upon the lowest sub-rank. For example, if you are a Leader in the reporting sub-category and a Superstar in the other five categories, your Partner Rewards Level will be Leader. These levels are also calculated every single day around 8 AM EST. This allows all of you to have a chance to increase your Partner Rewards Level and maintain your high statuses. Remember – all matching will be calculated based on your organization’s Partner Rewards Level as of 11:00 PM EDT (time in your city) on Tuesday, July 15th! Be sure that your Partner Rewards Level is secure by this time.

Bonus Day Tips and Tricks

Follow the strategy below to plan out a success Bonus Day.

Week 1, June 23-27: Start initial preparations for the Bonus Day

  • Bonus Day Funding Goal (excluding matching funds and bonus prizes):______________
  • How many donors do you need to reach your funding goal?:________________
  • Learn more about Partner Rewards Bonus Day by clicking here.
  • Learn your organization’s Partner Rewards Level.

Week 2, June 30 – July 4: Identify supporters and get feedback

  • Identify potential donors, such as board members, former volunteers and interns, and friends/family
  • Identify donor captains. Donor captains are responsible for raising a funding goal on the day of Bonus Day. For example, a donor captain may be a former intern that is excited about your work and pledges to raise a certain amount of money from a certain amount of donors for your project. Donor captains help your organization grow its network of supporters.
  • Contact donor captains. Let them know why you are asking for their help and tell them how they can help. Remember your donor captains are persons that care about your organization, the work you are doing, and most importantly they care about you (this is the number one reason donors give – they know and trust you)!
  • Set up a consultation call with Katherine to go over your strategy and get feedback. Click here to sign up for a consultation.

Week 3, July 7 – July 11: Begin communication with supporters and write communications for Bonus Day

    • Send an email to your network letting them know that on July 16th you will be asking them for a favor, and tell them to look out for an email. Include a quote from a beneficiary, a story about one of your beneficiaries, or an update on how your project is doing. You want to make sure that you remind them about the great work your organization is doing, and why their donation will make a difference. Include a world clock announcer, so they know that time Bonus Day starts in their location, but do not include the link to give.
    • Call you major donors and supporters to let them know about the Bonus Day on the 16th, and that they should be on the look out for an email from you about how to give on July 16th
    • Put together messaging for your organization to use on Bonus Day. This should include the following:
  1. A project report for GlobalGiving. Submit your project report to GlobalGiving before Bonus Day, and request that it be sent out on July 16th at 9 AM EDT (Bonus Day start time). In your project report include an update about your project, a quote from a beneficiary, and/or story of one of your beneficiaries. Also, don’t forget to include a call-to-action for donors to give on Bonus Day. Your project report should inspire them to give.
  2. Write and send messaging for your donor captains  to use for Bonus Day asks. You want to make sure that assisting your organization is easy for them, and that they are sharing the correct information. Include a template email, sample tweets, and sample Facebook posts, if relevant.

Week 4, July 14 – 18: Bonus Day week and thank you notes

    • Day before Bonus Day: Send out an email to supporters the day before Bonus Day letting them know that there is an opportunity for them to have their donation matched. Let them know when Bonus Day starts. Include the world clock event announcer, so they know what time Bonus Day starts in their location. Do not include a link to your project page or how to give quite yet!
    • Bonus Day: When Bonus Day starts at 9 AM EDT, send out an email to your supporters letting them know that you are now asking for the favor, and why. Include directions on how to give, by including a direct link to your project page. Remember – do not send donors to GlobalGiving’s homepage! Please send donors directly to your project page in order to minimize confusion and clicks.
    • Day after Bonus Day: Make sure you thank your donors in a timely manner by using GlobalGiving’s thank you note feature. Click here to learn more about the thank you note feature.

Support at GlobalGiving

If you are feeling overwhelmed at all about the Bonus Day, there is no need to worry. GlobalGiving is here to help! Katherine will be setting up consultations calls for anyone who wants to know more about Partner Rewards, how to increase their Partner Rewards, and additional information about the Bonus Day. You can click here to sign up!

Listen, Act, Learn. Repeat.

We know your time and resources are valuable. We want to help you be as effective as possible with those resources, and we’ve seen that effectiveness is driven by a cycle of progress that involves listening, acting, and learning (and repeating — doing it all again). Below, find an exercise that will help you start the listening, acting, and learning process.

  • LISTEN: You just listened to a presentation on fundraising for Partner Rewards Bonus Day and read a summary of the presentation.
  • ACT: What is one fundraising strategy you are going to use to fundraise for Partner Rewards Bonus Day?
  • LEARN: How will you know whether your fundraising strategy worked? What results will you look for in order to measure success?

All the Best,

Sylvia Lorenzini & The GlobalGiving Team

Tell your story from a better point of view – theirs

Posted by Marc Maxson on May 9th, 2014

give_now

GlobalGiving has always required its partner organizations to send progress reports to their donors. And for good reason: sometimes these donors click the “give’ button when they read a compelling update. In fact, between 2007 and 2014, global givers gave $1,077,000 through progress reports.

gg_storytelling

Because of my work on the GlobalGiving Storytelling project, I’ve been long interested in whether I could write a computer algorithm that would be able to tell the difference between a “good” story and a “poor” one. Last week I figured out how to detect a story’s point of view, and it appears to have a huge effect on whether people are inspired to give.

It turns out that there are 7 points of view that a story, narrative, or progress report could have:

These range from cool to warm, from personal to collective. But which of these is points of view is best if the goal is to get people to give again?

The Results

I ran the “point of view” detector on all GlobalGiving progress reports to date and all of our East African community effort stories. For contrast, I included 812 examples of great storytelling from Cowbird.com, which has been emailing me a “story of the day” for the last two years. These Cowbird stories are manually curated, and thus they reflect what points of view people find most emotionally compelling.

How common is each point of view?

The fraction of reports with each perspective is shown in the box. Multiply by 100 to get percents.

GlobalGiving Project Reports (N=25,337) East African Community Stories (N=61,946) Cowbird.com Story of the day (N=812)
fourth “this org” 0.35 fourth “this org” 0.29 first singular “I” 0.514
first plural “we” 0.268 third plural “they” 0.197 third singular “he” 0.112
third plural “we” 0.126 None (no pronouns) 0.18 fourth “it” 0.108
third singular “he” 0.098 third singular “he” 0.117 None (no pronouns) 0.078
second “you” 0.069 first plural “we” 0.084 first plural “we” 0.07
first singular “I” 0.046 first singular “I” 0.078 second “you” 0.057
None 0.04 mixed 0.049 third plural 0.033
mixed 0.003 second 0.007 mixed 0.028

People who talked about community activities in our East African storytelling project tended to focus on “it” stories, mentioning “this organization” much more than any person, including themselves. Project leaders on GlobalGiving were even more likely to talk about themselves. 51% of Cowbird’s “story of the day” collection is told primarily from a first person perspective.

Only 5% of all reports told their story using a “mixed” perspective. An example of a “mixed” perspective is where the organization reminds the reader who they are and why what they do matters, then shifts to letting a beneficiary tell his or her own story (an “I” story), then wraps up by acknowledging that donors helped make this happen (a “you” story).

Example:

We’re gearing up to head to Uganda! By the time you get this, we’ll be gone. Thanks to your support we will be taking additional fabric that they can not purchase there (and exploring further with dignitaries how to mnake that fabric available in Uganda). We’ll distribute kits…

You should see the girl’s faces when they receive kits. I hope you can come someday. They are so grateful. The last time we were there a girl in Gulu, Uganda said when she was asked if her kit would really change anything, “I will no longer have to fear.” Thanks to you more girls will have more dignity, more safety, less distraction at school and yes, less fear. For that matter, without your support, she might not have been able to stay in class at all. It never ceases to amaze me that such a simple, direct solution improves so much for girls around the globe. Thank you for being an important part of the solution.

The “mixed perspective” does best:

 Effectiveness of project reports in raising money None third plural (they) fourth (this org, it) first plural (we) third singular (he) first singular (I) second (you) mixed
Total $$ raised 78 220 267 292 302 329 421 567
Donations per report 0.9 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.5 3.8 4.8 6.5
Average $$ per donation 24.9 46.7 53.9 55.8 52.4 51.9 58.0 60.5
Number of reports (N) 611 2519 7413 5881 2184 1056 1449 98

 

Notes: N = 25,337 published reports. Data includes cases where nobody gave any money after reading reports (23% of the total).

Project reports with a “mixed” perspective raise 111% more money and get 160% more donations than reports with “fourth” org-centric point of view.

The Gap

There is a huge gap between how most organizations speak and what donors respond to. The green line near the center shows what fraction of stories have each of 6 points of view. The blue and red lines represent more donations and more money raised from a “you”, “I” and “you and I” mixed perspective:

donations-volume-size-vs-pov-projrept

Other factors:

  • High GlobalGiving staff progress report ratings correlate with more money raised. What we consider a five-star report raises more than the four, which raises more than a three, etc.
  • Women who write progress reports raise 30% more money, 30% more donations, and 5% larger donations than men do. (We inferred male/female from author names using www.i-gender.com)
  • It’s the setup, not the ask: Most reports include an explicit plea for more funding, with words like give, support, giving, or donate. Including this “ask” in your report helps donations a little, but far less than including a story from the people you are trying to help. Donors can see the big shiny orange give button and know what to do without being told.

Convinced yet? If so, then maybe you understand why GlobalGiving has been so effusive about organizations that listen to their communities and share this feedback through our story-centered-learning paradigm. The smartest way to fix your point of view is to talk to others and share their stories, instead of only writing from your perspective. Not only are reports with a “mixed” perspective better for the community (who have very few ways to speak to the people who influence money), they also are better for organizations (because GlobalGiving donors clearly appear to be listening).

Try before you publish!

I created a simple demo tool. Paste your text into the box and it will analyze your point of view: djotjog.com/c/report/.

This is just one more way that Globalgiving helps organizations listen, act, and learn  more, faster. In fact we’re giving away money through our storytelling fund to encourage everyone to do this.

Online Fundraising Academy: Fundraising Evaluation and Analysis

Posted by Alexis Nadin on May 1st, 2014

kaylanKaylan Christofferson, GlobalGiving’s Business Intelligence Analyst, joined us for the final session of the 2014 Online Fundraising Academy to talk about Fundraising Evaluation and Analysis. Kaylan and her team support GlobalGiving in financial goal setting and benchmarking and lead the charge in tracking annual progress and evaluating year-end results. She is responsible for compiling a weekly analysis of site activity and donations. She discussed the value of goal-setting and ongoing monitoring of fundraising activities and provided concrete tips to get started!

Session recording: https://www.anymeeting.com/WebConference-beta/RecordingDefault.aspx?c_psrid=EF56DA888348  

Session notes:

Fundraising Analysis

WHO should be using data to drive fundraising strategy?

  • If your organization has limited resources and if your organization is working for an important cause (which should be everyone!), you should be looking at data.
  • With limited resources, you need to use resources as efficiently as possible. 
  • If working for important cause, data can help to maximize effectiveness to generate more funds for your work

AdWords-Best-Practice_Loves-DataWHY should we use data?

  • Data analysis is using the numbers to help guide your actions, set fundraising goals, and measure progress so you can maximize funds to support your mission
  • When resources are limited, using your time efficiently and effectively is even more important!
  • Example: Look at time spent on different fundraising activities to compare how effective each activity is. Can see that board outreach is more time-efficient. This is not saying that you should only focus on your most efficient activity, but this can help you be more efficient and help you stay on track with your fundraising goals.

Fundraising Activity

Time Spent on Activity

Total Donations from Activity

Email outreach

10 hours

$1,000

Board outreach

3 hours

$1,000

Social media

5 hours

$300

WHEN should you use data to set goals?

  1. Before a particular fundraising campaign or event
  2. Annual strategic planning and throughout the year

Example 1: Set a goal before a particular campaign/event – Bonus Day

How much money can your organization raise on Bonus Day? (more…)

Online Fundraising Academy: Donor-Centered Retention Strategy

Posted by Alexis Nadin on April 24th, 2014

CCA_Brochure_6We were fortunate to have David Schaeffer, the Vice President of Development at the Children’s Cancer Association, join us for the eighth session of the Online Fundraising Academy! David has close to twenty years of fundraising experience, having worked in development for multiple organizations including Make A Wish Foundation, the American Cancer Society, and now, the Children’s Cancer Association. He is joining the Academy for the second year in a row to share his organization’s donor-centered approach to retention.

Watch the session recording here.

Session notes:

Children’s Cancer Association – A nonprofit based in Portland that provides support and joy to children with cancer and their families

Donor Retention – measure of how many donors continue to donate to your organization

  • High retention rate means you have a strong base of donors – the longer donors give, the more likely they will continue to give
  • Low retention rate means you have to keep finding new donors – difficult and expensive, not an effective use of money or time
  • This study Fundraising Effectiveness Project (FEP) found that:
    • Between 2006 and 2011, donor retention rates decreased by about 10%
    • Overall donor retention was 39% in 2012, down from 41% in 2011
    • Repeat donor retention was 61%
    • New donor retention was only 23%
    • Attrition eating into ability to retain donors – For every 100 donors gained, organizations lost 105 donors

Some causes of donor attrition

  • They have no memory of supporting the organization – make sure they know where they’re money is going; connect back to the mission
  • The organization asked for an inappropriate amount – create gift arrays starting with your organization’s average donation amount (the amount your donors like to give)
  • They were not reminded to give again – reach out to people at least 2x year to give them a chance to give
  • They didn’t feel connected – help them understand why they give
  • The organization didn’t tell them how donations were used

Ways to increase donor retention

  • Know who donors are, metrics, donor analysis for communications
  • 91 days is the lapsed period – if you don’t reach out to donors 91 days after their initial donation, you’ll most likely lose them. Need to acknowledge them right away.
  • Personalize your communication – build one-on-one relationships
  • Show donors how their funds help you achieve your mission
  • Send thank you letters
    • Be brief, personal
    • Include a story of a beneficiary, how donor dollars are being used, and give them a chance to contact you
    • Don’t ask for another gift – donor may not see it as a sincere thank you
  • Segment your communication to donors
    • Send specific communications to certain groups of donors (making sure it’s personalized)
    • Segment by past giving, zip code, age – send emails to people it’s most relevant to
  • Create a donor stewardship moves management plan

CCA Acknowledgment Standards
(more…)

Make the Most of December Fundraising

Posted by Alexis Nadin on December 10th, 2013

We’re 10 days into December and this month has already been one for the record books. Last Tuesday, December 3rd, was #GivingTuesday, GlobalGiving’s largest online volume day in history! GlobalGiving processed over $630,000 in donations on December 3rd (not including $250,000 in matching funds provided by Microsoft!).

But there are still 21 days left in this very important month of giving. (Read more about year-end giving trends here.) What is your organization doing to take advantage of the fundraising momentum? Here are some ideas to help you capitalize on the last three weeks of the year.

Year-End Campaign

Year-End Campaign

Raise at least $3,000 from at least 30 donors in the month of December and your organization could qualify for one of nine bonus awards (ranging from $3,000 to $500). GlobalGiving is giving away bonus awards to the top nine projects that raise the most money in the Year-End Campaign. With another 21 days left in this campaign, there’s still plenty of time for your organization to get in the game! Read complete terms and conditions here.

  • Put together a communications strategy. Plan to send out at least three email appeals announcing the Year-End Campaign. Use Facebook and other social media to promote this campaign.
  • Contact major supporters. Identify major supporters—board members, volunteers, major donors—to help you raise at least $3,000 from at least 30 donors. Reach out directly via email or phone to ask specifically for their help. Remember to show appreciation for their past support and to explain why their help is needed now.
  • Create a compelling message. What could your organization do in 2014 with an extra $3,000? Create a message that you can use throughout your campaign about the impact that your donors can make by giving to your project in December.
  • Show and tell stories about your community. Include concise, specific, and compelling stories and close-up, high-resolution photos in your messages to supporters.

Ecard

Christmas Giving

Christmas is two weeks away. Don’t forget: your supporters can make a donation to your project as a gift for a family member or friend! GlobalGiving will send the gift recipient an email, print-at-home, or physical tribute card.

  • Send out a “last-minute Christmas gift” email appeal the week before Christmas. Invite your supporters to make a donation as a gift to your project.
  • Share a direct link to the “gift or in-honor-of” tab on your project page in all of your donor communications. Here’s how to create the direct link to the “gift” option:

[Project URL] + ?show=gift

  • Give your supporters specific gift options, ex: $50 provides a microloan to a woman in Uganda or $40 provides on year of school for a child in India.
  • Share a story and a photo of a child, woman, or furry friend that will benefit from this gift.

december-31-300x300

December 31

According to our friends at Network for Good, 10% of online donations made in the U.S. happen during the last three days of the year: Dec 29, 30, and 31. This is a huge opportunity for your organization to drive last-minute donations before the end of the year!

  • Send at least one (if not two) year-end appeals on December 30 or 31.
  • Donations through GlobalGiving.org are tax-deductible for U.S. tax-payers.
  • Tell your supporters about the impact that your organization can have in 2014 with their year-end gifts.

Recurring Donation Match

From December 20 through the 31st, GlobalGiving will be offering a one-time 100% match on all new recurring donations up to $200 per donor! To qualify for the match, donors must give at least four consecutive months. Read complete terms and conditions here.

  • Target outreach to your existing donors. Signing up for a recurring donation is a much bigger commitment than making a one-time donation. Focus your outreach on individuals who have supported your organization before.recurring-donation
  • Share a direct link to the recurring donation tab on your project page in all of your donor communications. Here’s how to create the direct link:

[Project URL] + ?show=recurring

  • Say a big thank you for a bigger commitment! Consider recognizing your recurring donors in a special way by featuring them on your organization’s website, sending them special updates, or giving away a mug or a t-shirt.
  • Stress the added value of making a recurring donation during this promotion. Let your donors know that their recurring donation will receive a one-time 100% match! Emphasize that they have to sign up now to qualify.

Tips and Tricks for Successful Holiday Fundraising on GlobalGiving

Posted by Katherine Sammons on November 7th, 2013

Recently we held a webinar on Holiday Fundraising on GlobalGiving. We went over the campaigns, GlobalGiving is hosting this holiday season and a holiday campaign strategy. Did you miss it? Not to worry, below please find a summary of tips and tricks, the slides used, and a recording of the webinar.

Want to read the full terms and conditions of all the campaigns listed below? Click here to learn more about the Thank You Promotion, Gifts for Good, The Recurring Donation Promotion, and GlobalGiving’s first ever Year-End Campaign!

Tips for Success by Campaign: 

The Year-End Campaign

  • Make a plan-How does your organization want to reach the $3,000 threshold from 30 donors?
  • Review GlobalGiving’s tools (tribute cards, fundraiser pages, etc.)- Meet with your team, Board Members, volunteers, etc. to review GlobalGiving’s tools to decide which tools your organization would like to utilize.
  • Review GlobalGiving’s campaigns-What works best for your organization?
  • Set-up a call with a GlobalGiving staff member-We are here to help you set-up a strategy by making a plan that best fits your organization. Click here to sign-up for a one-on-one call.

Gifts for Good

  • Consider the cost of this promotion for your organization  when determining donation amount-Take in to account shipping costs (including the cost to expedite shipping), the price of the product, and the cost of staff time.
  • Give gifts that are unique, interesting, and relevant- Give a gift that was  made by a beneficiary or give a gift from the location where your project is being completed.
  • Include the “story” behind your gift in your description- Where is the gift from? How does the gift tie in to the work your organization is doing?
  • Ship items quickly–Donors that purchase your gift are now your donors, so treat them as such.  Make sure gifts are shipped in a timely manner in order to ensure the gift arrives in time for the holiday. Your donors are looking forward to the arrival of your Gift for Good.
  • Include a personalized note or card in your package-Donors purchased your gift because they are inspired by your work! Thank them and tell them how their purchase for good will benefit your project’s work.

The Recurring Donation Campaign

  • Let your donors know that they can give a gift that keeps on giving- Some donors aren’t familiar with the recurring donation option on GlobalGiving. Educate them. 
  • Communicate the match- Make sure that your donors know what to do in order for your project to receive a match. In order for a donor’s initial donation to be matched, the donor must keep it active for at least 3 consecutive months (that’s four months all together)
  • Tell your organization’s story and how donations will help-Explain how a continuous contribution will help your project succeed. For example, giving $25 ensures that Susan will have writing materials for class.

Thank Your Promotion

  • Keep your videos short (no longer than 1 minute)-Please keep your video short in order to keep the attention of the viewer.
  • Make sure your video is shot in high resolution-Videos shot in high resolution are desired.
  • Submit content that is relevant to your project- Include footage of your beneficiaries (please always ask permission first), or your field staff, to share your work with donors.

The Highlights

1. Set Goals- When planning for the holidays set goals, lots of them! Set goals around:

  • Your communication strategy-how many people do you want to reach? And, how will you reach them?
  • How much funding does your organization want to raise during the holiday season?
  • Who does your organization need to help reach the goal? So for example, will your organization need to enlist volunteers, Board Members, and/or former interns?

2. Mobilize through a campaign- Pick one or more of GlobalGiving’s campaigns to help engage your donors.  Talk with GlobalGiving staff to learn what campaigns fit your organization best.

3. Create a communications calendar- Put together a communications calendar focusing on dates of communication and type (for example email or phone)

4. Develop your messaging- Have communication ready and set to send and implement. Make sure you communicate the correct terms and conditions with your donor base. Provide messaging to those helping you fundraise, by creating template emails and social media tool-kit.

5. Evaluate your progress and prepare to be flexible- Keep track of your project’s fundraising efforts.  If a fundraising tactic is not working for your organization, prepare to be flexible and adjust your strategy accordingly.

Resources Just for You! 

Tools and training blog

•We are here to help!- Sign-up for One-on-one support