Archive for the ‘Trainings’ Category

 

How to Collect Stories from Your Community

Posted by Alexis Nadin on May 5th, 2014

Last week, GlobalGivng staff Britt Lake, Marc Maxson, and Sarah Hennessy held a webinar on the recently announced Storytelling Fund. We reviewed some definitions and background on feedback, learned more about using the Storytelling Tool, and finally learning about applying to the Storytelling Fund.

Watch the recording here.

What is Feedback? Why is it important?

Collecting feedback is an important way for you to gather information from your community to improve the services you offer to your beneficiaries or constituents. Closing feedback loops helps you move beyond simply collecting data in community surveys- by acting on that information, and communicating those actions back to your constituents, you can engage your community in a more impactful cycle of learning and improving your work. You’ve heard us talking about listening, acting, and learning- closing a feedback loop helps your organization do all three.

Collecting and acting on feedback from your constituents is analogous to conducting consumer satisfaction surveys in a for-profit setting. These surveys help businesses measure their performance and adjust their activities accordingly. The same principle applies to collecting feedback from the community in which you work. This type of “bottom-up” information helps you adjust your programming to ensure that you are meeting the needs of your community, and amplifying your impact as much as possible.

There are a variety of effective ways to collect and act on feedback- and, with the new GG Effectiveness Dashboard, we are giving you credit for doing it! One method of collecting feedback from your community is through the GG Storytelling Tool. This tool guides you through the collection of stories from your community about the issues that they find most pressing, and then helps you analyze that qualitative data in order to help you discover how best adjust your programming. In short, this tool helps you make sense of a large amount of qualitative information (stories) by turning it into quantitative information (like more traditional M&E approaches).

What is the GG Storytelling Tool?

So how does the tool work? Here’s what the Storytelling Cycle looks like:

Storytelling lifecycle

Find information on the tool, as well as a step-by-step guide, here.

After building your storytelling form online, you can train a group of volunteers to take those forms into your community (using a computer or via paper) and collect stories. We call these volunteers “scribes”. We have found that using volunteers from your organization, rather than staff, can help in obtaining the least biased and most helpful stories. Remember, you should not just collect stories from your direct beneficiaries, but also look to your community at large for feedback. While it may seem like your direct beneficiaries would give you the best information about your programming, the most useful feedback will actually be both from those closest to your work, as well as those tangentially affected: parents, neighbors, and friends of your direct beneficiaries, who are all, in one way or another, effected by your organization. (more…)

Apply for Professional Storytelling Support

Posted by Katherine Sammons on May 5th, 2014

 

GlobalGiving is excited to offer a new storytelling support program! GlobalGiving’s Angela Wu will visit an organization in August to help capture stories of impact through photographs, video, or short narratives. Angela is a professional photographer and has her own photography company, Mustard Tights. Stories, whether visual, oral, or written, capture an audience and succinctly show the work and impact of your organization. Storytelling isn’t just about posting a photo on Facebook, rather, storytelling is intentional and creates lasting connections. Click here to learn three reasons why nonprofits should practice storytelling. Learn more about the application below and apply today!

Angela Wu

Angela Wu

Application Highlights          

Due Date:  June 13, 2014

Application: Click here 

Selection Date: July 3, 2014

 

Please send questions about the application or program  to ksammons@globalgiving.org. Thank you!

 

Online Fundraising Academy: Fundraising Evaluation and Analysis

Posted by Alexis Nadin on May 1st, 2014

kaylanKaylan Christofferson, GlobalGiving’s Business Intelligence Analyst, joined us for the final session of the 2014 Online Fundraising Academy to talk about Fundraising Evaluation and Analysis. Kaylan and her team support GlobalGiving in financial goal setting and benchmarking and lead the charge in tracking annual progress and evaluating year-end results. She is responsible for compiling a weekly analysis of site activity and donations. She discussed the value of goal-setting and ongoing monitoring of fundraising activities and provided concrete tips to get started!

Session recording: https://www.anymeeting.com/WebConference-beta/RecordingDefault.aspx?c_psrid=EF56DA888348  

Session notes:

Fundraising Analysis

WHO should be using data to drive fundraising strategy?

  • If your organization has limited resources and if your organization is working for an important cause (which should be everyone!), you should be looking at data.
  • With limited resources, you need to use resources as efficiently as possible. 
  • If working for important cause, data can help to maximize effectiveness to generate more funds for your work

AdWords-Best-Practice_Loves-DataWHY should we use data?

  • Data analysis is using the numbers to help guide your actions, set fundraising goals, and measure progress so you can maximize funds to support your mission
  • When resources are limited, using your time efficiently and effectively is even more important!
  • Example: Look at time spent on different fundraising activities to compare how effective each activity is. Can see that board outreach is more time-efficient. This is not saying that you should only focus on your most efficient activity, but this can help you be more efficient and help you stay on track with your fundraising goals.

Fundraising Activity

Time Spent on Activity

Total Donations from Activity

Email outreach

10 hours

$1,000

Board outreach

3 hours

$1,000

Social media

5 hours

$300

WHEN should you use data to set goals?

  1. Before a particular fundraising campaign or event
  2. Annual strategic planning and throughout the year

Example 1: Set a goal before a particular campaign/event – Bonus Day

How much money can your organization raise on Bonus Day? (more…)

Online Fundraising Academy: Donor-Centered Retention Strategy

Posted by Alexis Nadin on April 24th, 2014

CCA_Brochure_6We were fortunate to have David Schaeffer, the Vice President of Development at the Children’s Cancer Association, join us for the eighth session of the Online Fundraising Academy! David has close to twenty years of fundraising experience, having worked in development for multiple organizations including Make A Wish Foundation, the American Cancer Society, and now, the Children’s Cancer Association. He is joining the Academy for the second year in a row to share his organization’s donor-centered approach to retention.

Watch the session recording here.

Session notes:

Children’s Cancer Association – A nonprofit based in Portland that provides support and joy to children with cancer and their families

Donor Retention – measure of how many donors continue to donate to your organization

  • High retention rate means you have a strong base of donors – the longer donors give, the more likely they will continue to give
  • Low retention rate means you have to keep finding new donors – difficult and expensive, not an effective use of money or time
  • This study Fundraising Effectiveness Project (FEP) found that:
    • Between 2006 and 2011, donor retention rates decreased by about 10%
    • Overall donor retention was 39% in 2012, down from 41% in 2011
    • Repeat donor retention was 61%
    • New donor retention was only 23%
    • Attrition eating into ability to retain donors – For every 100 donors gained, organizations lost 105 donors

Some causes of donor attrition

  • They have no memory of supporting the organization – make sure they know where they’re money is going; connect back to the mission
  • The organization asked for an inappropriate amount – create gift arrays starting with your organization’s average donation amount (the amount your donors like to give)
  • They were not reminded to give again – reach out to people at least 2x year to give them a chance to give
  • They didn’t feel connected – help them understand why they give
  • The organization didn’t tell them how donations were used

Ways to increase donor retention

  • Know who donors are, metrics, donor analysis for communications
  • 91 days is the lapsed period – if you don’t reach out to donors 91 days after their initial donation, you’ll most likely lose them. Need to acknowledge them right away.
  • Personalize your communication – build one-on-one relationships
  • Show donors how their funds help you achieve your mission
  • Send thank you letters
    • Be brief, personal
    • Include a story of a beneficiary, how donor dollars are being used, and give them a chance to contact you
    • Don’t ask for another gift – donor may not see it as a sincere thank you
  • Segment your communication to donors
    • Send specific communications to certain groups of donors (making sure it’s personalized)
    • Segment by past giving, zip code, age – send emails to people it’s most relevant to
  • Create a donor stewardship moves management plan

CCA Acknowledgment Standards
(more…)

Announcing the Storytelling Fund!

Posted by Alexis Nadin on April 17th, 2014

gg-storytelling-logo-croppedHere at GlobalGiving, we believe that good feedback loops are crucial to becoming an effective development organization.  In order to solve the world’s biggest problems, we must be Listening to constituents, peers, and experts; Acting on what we hear; and Learning from those experiences.   We want to help you to become more effective through this process as well!

We just launched our Effectiveness Dashboard to help you track and improve your own progress along this cycle.  One way your organization can earn points is by collecting feedback from those who benefit from your services.  You can’t listen to your community, act on what you hear, and learn from those experiences without first collecting feedback from the community where you do your work.

GlobalGiving’s Storytelling methodology asks community members:Tell us about a time when a person or an organization tried to change something in your community.”  Storytellers then answer a few basic questions about their story, and the tools we’ve developed can help you analyze those stories to inform your programs and help you better understand your community.

Storytelling Fund

To make this process a little easier, GlobalGiving is offering technical support and up to $2,000 to help your organization collect the feedback it needs through our Storytelling methodologyAs an added bonus, you’ll also earn points on your Effectiveness Dashboard!   The deadline to apply is May 17.

Storytelling Webinar

To help you develop a plan for collecting feedback within your community and to provide you with more details about the new Community Feedback Fund, GlobalGiving will be hosting a webinar on Wednesday, April 30 at 9 am EDT (Find this time in your city) and 3 pm EDT (Find this time in your city). Sign up for the webinar here.

Want to apply?  Here are the Terms and Conditions:

  • Only GlobalGiving Partners, Leaders, and Superstars with active projects on GlobalGiving.org are eligible to apply.
  • Organizations may apply for a maximum of $2,000 in funds to be used to cover costs specific to story collecting, and must include a draft budget for the support sought.
  • Organizations receiving the funds must use the GlobalGiving storytelling tool to collect these community stories.  All stories become part of the GlobalGiving’s open source database.
  • Storytelling Funds can be used to cover incremental costs for collecting stories, including:
    • Printing or copying the story form
    • Volunteer/scribe/storyteller incentives (but not regular staff salary)
    • Translation and transcription of the forms or stories
    • Workshop space rental
  • Funds will be sent after the first 100 stories are collected and entered into the Storytelling database.  It is the responsibility of the organization to notify GlobalGiving when the stories are collected and to submit receipts of the costs.
  • The first 100 stories must be collected before September 1, 2014 or GlobalGiving reserves the right to revoke the funds.
  • In addition to funding, recipients selected for this opportunity also receive:
    • A pre-collection call with a GlobalGiving storytelling expert to help design your story collection;
    • Participation in a training webinar on using the tool and analyzing the data for an unlimited number of staff;
    • Ongoing support from GlobalGiving storytelling experts while the initial storytelling is conducted;
    • One round of post-collection analysis.
  • The deadline to apply is May 17, 2014.

Can GlobalGiving Help You Become More Effective?

Posted by Alexis Nadin on April 17th, 2014

As you know, GlobalGiving offers a set of tools to help you raise funds from individual donors and progressive companies. But that’s only part of our mission. Our mission is to catalyze a marketplace for information, ideas and money, helping you access not only critical funding, but also critical tools and knowledge so that you can be as effective as possible with the resources you do have.

What do we mean by effectiveness? Well here’s what we’ve seen: whether in business, government or the nonprofit sector, the world’s most agile and adaptable organizations are learning organizations. They’re engaged in a continuous Cycle of Progress: listening, acting, learning, and repeating. (Sound a little like a core value you might have heard from us before?) These organizations are constantly honing what they do based on the best information they can get their hands on.

So that’s our mandate: we are working to create better ways for you to listen to your peers, your constituents, and researchers in your field, so that you can test those ideas, learn, and improve! We have reason to believe that by giving you opportunities to experiment and learn from real-time feedback through the GlobalGiving platform, we’ll be giving you the tools you need to experiment and improve your work in the community you serve! By giving you access to the kinds of tools and information that can inspire and accelerate this “Listen, Act, Learn. Repeat.”cycle, we believe we’re one step closer to helping you increase your own social impact on the ground.

This is why we’re introducing the Effectiveness Dashboard for GlobalGiving’s nonprofit partners. Find it by clicking on one of the Listen, Act, or Learn boxes on your main GlobalGiving dashboard (or click this link: https://www.globalgiving.org/dy/v2/pe/analytics/effectiveness.html). But before you panic… STOP! Don’t worry, we’re not creating a bunch of new hoops for you to jump through to demonstrate your effectiveness. We’re simply putting a new framework in place to track what you’re already doing.

EffectivenessScreenshot

The first 200 organizations that visit their dashboard and answer these 3 questions about it will receive a bonus $25 prize, just for checking it out. Visit your dashboard now!

Go to my Effectiveness Dashboard

Questions? Learn more about the Effectivness Dashboard in the FAQs here. This dashboard is very much in early stages, and you can expect that we’ll solicit your feedback to create the best tools and resources that help accelerate your progress in a way that does not distract from your work. Help us improve it by sharing your comments and questions by emailing projecthelp@globalgiving.org.

Ideally, as you Listen, Act, Learn. Repeat, you’ll be able to track your progress on the dashboard.  And as you’re demonstrating your progress toward effectiveness, we want to  provide you with the kind of exposure to assure the entire world knows it, so your funding can increase as you demonstrate your progress toward becoming more effective.  That’s why later this year, we will begin to incorporate your effectiveness into your Partner Rewards and your project ranking. Don’t worry, we will give you plenty of warning before any changes go into effect and we will continue to welcome your feedback and input when that happens.

Thanks for being part of this learning journey with us!

Online Fundraising Academy: Corporate Outreach and Relationship Building

Posted by Alexis Nadin on April 17th, 2014

ingridThis Tuesday, Ingrid Embree, GlobalGiving’s Director of Strategic Partnerships joined us for the seventh session of the Online Fundraising Academy to discuss how she identifies and builds relationships with prospective corporate partners. Ingrid has helped more than 60 different companies achieve their philanthropic objectives with GlobalGiving. She has a history of helping organizations meet their operational objectives, develop fundraising capacity, and achieve legislative victories. Check out the session summary below!

Session recording: https://www.anymeeting.com/WebConference-beta/RecordingDefault.aspx?c_psrid=EF55D8888046

Session notes:

Tips on how to get recommended to corporate partners on GG

  • The higher you partner reward status, the better – GG recommends Superstars to corporate partners first
  • Make sure you have a compelling project – have appropriate title and themes

Corporate Giving Trends – Good news!

  • 86% of U.S. companies plan to maintain or increase their international giving budget in the next fiscal year.
  • Local communities’ needs were the most influential factor for giving.
  • Younger workers prefer companies that engage in corporate social responsibility (CSR) and are pushing companies to change their traditional giving
  • 90% of people expect companies to support social or environmental issues.
  • CEOs are getting more involved in community involvement

Social-ResponsibilityCorporate Giving – What’s Important?

  • Corporations make investments when they intersect with the community, employees and company – the more categories your organization fits into, the better
  • You are the barometer of community needs – corporations like that they can hear what’s going on in your community
  • You are the subject matter expert – they want to hear the details, updates

Use trust indicators – this is a high trust relationship, so use as many trust indicators you have to prove you can be trusted

  • GlobalGiving – rigorous vetting process
  • Charity Navigator, Great Nonprofits, BBB Accredited Charity
  • Memberships, endorsements – anything that shows you’re legitimate
  • Memberships to professional associations
  • Local registered organizations that recognize your work
  • Quotes from donors, beneficiaries

“Development” is a lot like sales. It just takes longer, but you can use some of the same tools.

1. Research – target your list of people to reach out to

  • Wikipedia search “list of companies in [city]” – look at companies based there, have a strong presence; then expand search to the metropolitan, county, state, and country level
  • Google search “Company Name + Community Affairs” “+ CSR” “+ Philanthropy” “+ Giving” “+ Citizenship” etc. – get as much information about what they do, what they fund, who are the decision makers
  • Google News search their general financials – How is their stock? Any big layoffs? It’s a good time to reach out if their reputation took a hit
  • Search LinkedIn to see if your board, major donors, similar nonprofits, former classmates, etc. might know anyone at the company

(more…)

Online Fundraising Academy: Building a Donor Community on Facebook

Posted by Alexis Nadin on April 10th, 2014

ListbuilderIn the sixth session of the Online Fundraising Academy, Alison McQuade, the Digital Press Secretary for EMILY’s List, shared tips and recommendations for growing and engaging your network on Facebook.

Session recording link. 

Session notes:

Emily’s List – A political organization committed to electing pro-choice Democratic women to office

Edgerank – Facebook’s algorithm that decides what you see in your feed

  • Affinity – how much people like the post. Counts people’s interactions (commenting, liking, sharing, clicking on link)
  • Weight – posts that require more user engagement has more weight (i.e. sharing has more weight than a like)
  • Time decay - how old the post is. Most posts have a shelf life of one day

Different types of posts – use different posts to reach different goals

  • Link post – Post a compelling story for your audience
    • Have intro text (not just the link)
    • Timely post
  • The mobile phone post – take a picture on the ground with your mobile phone
    • Exciting, unfiltered picture, readers feel like they’re participating, doesn’t look advertised
    • Timely post – as it’s happening
    • Call to action – specifically ask them to do something “like picture and tell us in the comments what would you do”
    • Got lots of interactions because asked for it. Encourage them to interact so they feel like they’re a part of it
  • Go-to post – post what your audience loves.
    • Exciting picture and great quote that audience
    • Find out what your audience finds compelling to get them excited
    • Call to action to build email list (asked people to write thank you card for Hilary Clinton while getting people to sign up for emails)
  • List-builder post – have a call to action that gets people to join email list
    • Had people sign birthday card to Emily List’s president and subscribe to emails
    • Language corresponds with message and then transitions to why they should join your community and subscribe to emails
    • Simple graphic, creates emotion (happy/angry)
    • Easy lift – take advantage of milestones, holiday, birthdays, etc. as an opportunity to build list (more…)

Online Fundraising Academy: How to Write Earth-Changing Emails

Posted by Alexis Nadin on April 4th, 2014

In GlobalGiving’s fifth Online Fundraising Academy session, we invited our own Alison Carlman, to share tips and key lessons she’s learned in donor communications. In her role as Unmarketing Manager, Alison is responsible for engaging the GlobalGiving community and for telling the stories of GlobalGiving and its partner projects. In 2013, Alison and her team raised $270,000 from donor emails. 

Session Recordinghttp://www.anymeeting.com/globalgivingUS/EF54D686844C

Listen, test, learn, repeat – experimentation and testing key to improving work

  • Listen to your audience, peers, research
  • Test assumptions in experiments
  • Learn from your experiments
  • Do it again and again and again!

This is how GlobalGiving Listens, Tests, Learns and Repeats:

Listen

  • Users – your audience, the people who receive messages
    • To improve our e-newsletter, we got feedback from users – who opens, donates, clicks
    • What we learned:
  1.  Keep it short – people don’t read news
  2.  Talk about the users, not you – what’s relevant to them, why they should care
  3. Made it even shorter
  4. Use big images  – people click on the header image
  5. Use clear images with one person making eye contact.
  6. Add humor, make it clever and unexpected – include jokes, puns
  7. Have a big and clear call-to-action – make your ask clear and easy for users to do
  8. Personalize it! – add people’s names, send personalized thank you. Users like to know they’ve been thought of, not just written to the masses.
  • Peers – similar organizations you can learn from
    • charitywater emailcharity: water – use beautiful image, well laid-out, formatted for mobile phones, very little text, interesting lead text, unexpected, humorous and large call-to-action
    • donorschoose.org – personalized by state, simple and short, made it sound urgent, very clear request
    • Kiva – personalized, clear call-to-action, made it look like it was forwarded by a staff member
      • Did A/B testing (divide users into 2 groups and provided a different email to each group to see which email did better)
      • Kiva’s “trick” forwarded email performed 2x as well
      • Personalizing really works!
  • What we learned:
  1. Use beautiful imagery.
  2. Make it mobile friendly
  3. Keep it brief.
  4. Use interesting lead text.
  5. Try unexpected/humorous (but still visibly clear) calls-to-action.
  6. Try unexpected subject lines and formats
  • Project report titles are now the subject line when project reports are sent out to GlobalGiving donors
  • Theory – what does the research say?
  1. Shorten distance between user and subject matter – connect them to one person/animal/object. Easier to feel like you can make a difference in one person’s life than a big group.
  2. Tell a compelling story about that one person – how a person has overcome an obstacle or how they have potential to overcome obstacles
  3. Donors will give if they feel it will bring them close to people in their network – focus on what you can do for your users. Give them something to share so they can connect to their social network.
  4. People give more when it’s easy – Make the process to give as easy as possible. And give reminders
  5. Not all donors are the same – these tips won’t work for everyone. Need different messages for different donors.

Test, learn and repeat

  • Look at metrics to measure success of email

metrics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(more…)

Online Fundraising Academy: Cultivating a Fundraising Army

Posted by Alexis Nadin on March 26th, 2014

Marshall

In GlobalGiving’s fourth session of the Online Fundraising Academy, we invited Marshall Bailly, the Executive Director of Leadership Initiatives, to share tips for cultivating a donor network. Marshall and his team have raised $1 million through GlobalGiving, especially through targeted  matching campaigns. He has built relationships with a core group of donors that regularly support Leadership Initiatives via various promotions.  He has developed a comprehensive strategy for campaign outreach and communications, including local donor mobilization in Nigeria, where Leadership Initiatives operates.

Session Recording: www.anymeeting.com/900-634-271/EF54DA87884B

Session Notes:

Leadership Initiative (LI) – Finds community leaders in Nigeria, give them business training, give them investment to jumpstart their business, helps them build community from bottom up

  • For real donor growth, they have to feel they are a part of the organization, so they’ll want to contribute more than just money to your org
  • Give them a sense of ownership and show them their impact on the organization

Donor Committees – You can’t do it alone!

  • A group of 5-7 people that help raise money and set fundraising agenda
  • Create one month, six month, one year and five year plan for where you want your fundraising goals to be. And each person takes charge of one goal
  • Have reachable goals to motivate your committee
  • LI’s donor committee members
    • Met members through friends (and friends of friends), events, own social/family circle, staff on the ground
    • Developed relationships over years
    • Keep changing people when you can, so they don’t get burnt out. Want people coming in with new voices, new eyes

Donor Captains

  • Donor Captains go out and achieve goals
    • Allows you to spread the burden of finding more donors
    • Brings new people into the organization and allows them to take a leadership role
    • For last bonus day, had 15 donor captains, and each person was in charge of reaching 10 people.
      • Individual communication with donors get them excited and committed to donate
      • Reach out to active donors and donors with potential resources
        • Research all donors  – Google them, look at LinkedIn profile to see if they could be a resource
        • Reach out to them, ask for help growing your organization, contribute more than money

LI’s five types of donor network leaders

  • Social Leaders – people who know a lot of people
    • Goal: Create a generation of donors who stay connected with LI over many years
    • Specialty Type Donors – people with jobs that can help you get a special service and connections to improve your organization
      • Host an event to learn about organization with the extra fun factor to get people more excited
      • High End Donors – people who donate over $1,000 at a time
        • Slowly tell them about organization, build up trust, show you care, why they should care
        • Allow people to bring their ideas of how to make the organization better
        • Corporate Sponsors – organizations who donate over $1,000 at a time
          • Find corporations with a vested interest in the community you’re working in or some part of your organization
          • A wider networks helps to find connections with corporations
          • Business Alliance Program Students – high school students get help to get into college while they help solve development problems for businesses in Nigeria
            • Address needs of both students and businesses
            • Keep partnership with those students as they leave high school

Don’t chase “white whales”

  • Don’t keep chasing those who aren’t interested – chase those who care and ask questions
  • Don’t leave your donors angry – donors might test the waters to see if you care

LI Fundraising Timeline

  • Fundraising goals and donor network started out small, grew bigger and better each year
  • In the beginning was mostly donor committee, then events after three years, then first corporate sponsorship after five years
  • It takes time to build up, piece by piece

Get Ahead in this Competitive Environment  

  • Need to have something interesting, why people should care, an emotional connection and a call to action
    • Donors respond better to a problem, emotional story, and how they can change it
    • Put a face to the problem – donors can talk/skype to people on the ground
    • Need to grab their attention. Need to have good fundraising stories
    • Comparison chart – show what makes your organization unique and why it’s better than other organizations
    • Make sure donor captains are on the same page – they know mission statement, why you matter, how to elevate organization above the rest
      • Donor captains can give an elevator speech (30 second pitch for organization)

Communicating with Donors

  • Have different impact messages, communications for each group of donors (corporations get different message from GlobalGiving donors because have different interests in organization)
  • Have specialized social media, blogs, messaging for different donor groups
  • Refine, strengthen and sharpen key messages is important at any stage of an organizations growth and development every year
  • Have a goal for each donor to rally around

Extra resources

Click here for Marshall’s campaign fundraising webinar

Click here for Marshall’s bonus day how-to manual

Email Marshall at mbailly@leadershipinitiatives.org

Q: Is a donor committee and board the same thing? Is there significant overlap between the two?

A: Board does much more to grow and develop the organization than just fundraising. There are some overlaps though. LI has some board members in donor committees.

Q: What is your communication stories system to feed the stories in the field to people in the US?

A: LI has a key sponsorship program in Nigeria where they provide technology to Skype with businesses in Nigeria. LI has on the ground employees who provide stories. Each donor group is connected with different businesses.

Q: Do you utilize media?

A: Utilizing media comes from meeting people and following up with them. Marshall wrote letters and met with people who wrote reports. LI hasn’t gotten a media contact without investing in relationships, and they always reach out to media first. Be the group that’s so passionate and won’t go away.

Q: Do you have a template letter to reach out to corporations?

A: Have a specific letter for each corporation. Personalize the letter! Know their background and make any connections you can. Put a little personal hand written message in the letter or on the envelope.

*Trends from past sessions: Develop a personality. Make sure you’re real with the individuals you interact with. Build strong relationships with donors and make them feel appreciated and needed. Get out there, seek opportunities to meet new people, reach new audiences.