Effectiveness Posts

How Students with Dreams are Learning to Become Leaders

How Students with Dreams are Learning to Become Leaders

Art and Global Health Center Africa (AGHCA) is a recipient of GlobalGiving’s 2015 Feedback Fund. Recently, they shared these insights with us.

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Our Students With Dreams (SWD) program provides leadership training, mentorship, and seed funding to teams of college students to address challenges they identify in their communities in Malawi. We believe financial skills are critical. We teach our young leaders how to develop cost-effective, high-impact solutions from limited resources. In 2015 and 2016 we gathered feedback to better support them and the communities they serve.

We used several surveys about:

  • Dreamers’ experiences in the program.
  • Their self-assessment of their leadership and financial skills.
  • Their recommendations on how to improve the program. This included a focus group.

Creating Wealth Among Kenyan Youth

Creating Wealth Among Kenyan Youth

Vijana Amani Pamoja (VAP) has been a GlobalGiving partner since 2010. They have participated in storytelling for multiple years and designed their project from that process. Recently they shared their insights with us. 

Eunice, 23 years old, resides in Kiambiu and works as a hairdresser and beautician. She was one of the vocational training students for VAP’s 2014 cohort. Soon after completing her course, she was referred to Emma’s salon for a job placement as a hairdresser.

Her greatest joy is the fact that she doesn’t create a living for herself but for her sibling as well. ‘’I always wished to do hairdressing but I didn’t have the money to pursue my dream. In Mrembo salon, I learned both beauty and hairdressing and it has been of great help in my life. I’m now earning some money, I get paid on commission. I don’t earn a lot but the little I get covers my upkeep, pays my rent, and I help out a little bit with my family especially my little brother who I help with school fees. I would like to have my own salon and a beauty shop and currently I am saving towards that’’.

Binaytara: Feedback on Hospice Care in Nepal

Binaytara: Feedback on Hospice Care in Nepal

 Binaytara is a recipient of our 2015 Feedback Fund. Recently, they shared these insights with us.

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Even though the Binaytara Foundation has been around since 2007, we did not have any structured feedback loops in place until 2015. We relied on our partners and volunteers to give us informal feedback verbally or via email, and then made changes to our projects based on that feedback. In 2015 we started a feedback system, with help from GlobalGiving’s Feedback Fund.

Karuna Trust: What’s Lost in Translation in Conversations About Youth Dreams

Karuna Trust: What’s Lost in Translation in Conversations About Youth Dreams

Karuna Trust is a recipient of our 2015 Feedback Fund. Recently, they shared these insights with us.

As part of our work with partners in India and Nepal, Karuna Trust collected stories from the beneficiaries of the projects we’re supporting. It helps demonstrate the tangible change that the projects can bring to young people and their families. So we were excited to receive funding from GlobalGiving to try their storytelling method with two of our education projects – the Amaravati Hostel and Green Tara Trust. After discussing with our partners and GlobalGiving, we agreed to focus on exploring the hopes and dreams of young people. We wanted to find out what their ambitions were for their future, what they imagined their lives to be like, and what challenges they were facing. We hoped to create a picture where we could see form the results what extra support the young people might be requiring and this would help us to refine our work further.

CACE: Learning How to Ask Clear Questions

CACE: Learning How to Ask Clear Questions

Center for Amazon Community Ecology (CACE) is a recipient of our 2015 Feedback Fund. Recently they shared these insights with us.

We promote conservation and sustainable livelihoods by building stronger communities in the Peruvian Amazon. The Fund allowed us to ask local artisans we work with about their economic realities and dreams. Along the way, we learned how to ask these questions better, with these insights:

Phrase questions around peoples’ normal frame of reference

We initially thought that since most people do not keep any records about their earnings or expenses, we would get the most accurate responses by asking people to provide monthly “averages” for certain sources of income or types of things they paid for. In practice, artisans had the best recall when asked about the previous six months of economic activity combined.