Search Results For fail forward

Isha Vidhya’s Participation in the Feedback Loop for GlobalGiving

Isha Vidhya’s Participation in the Feedback Loop for GlobalGiving

Isha Vidhya was a recipient of our Feedback Fund. Recently, they shared these insights with us.

Constantly improving the quality of education imparted and the infrastructure has always been one of our top priorities at Isha Vidhya. In order to assess the satisfaction of the students and parents on Isha Vidhya matriculation schools, Isha Vidhya participated in a feedback program called ‘Feedback Loop’ that’s offered by one of the world’s renowned fundraising platforms Globalgiving.

We employed a few college students on a part-time basis to interview 280 students and 20 parents spread across three (Villupuram, Dharmapuri, and Salem) of our schools. Data collected was entered into a database and results were analyzed.

Survey results and plans of action

Submit to the 2017 Fail Forward Contest!

Submit to the 2017 Fail Forward Contest!

By Sonja Knudson, Program Team Fellow 2017-2018

Innovation is impossible without failure.  If you look at very successful people, their careers began with failure. Before he founded Microsoft, Bill Gates’ first product was a complete disaster. In high school, Michael Jordan was denied from the varsity basketball team. Oprah Winfrey was fired from her first job at a news station before her huge success as a television host. At GlobalGiving, we recognize the importance of failure. One of GlobalGiving’s core values is ‘Listen, Act, Learn, and Repeat– we try, fail productively, and continuously strive to learn from our experiences.

In our fourth annual Fail Forward Contest, we want to celebrate your failures! But not only that– we want you to share with your donors how your organization failed and then ‘Listened, Acted, Learned and Repeated’ in order to grow as an organization.

Enter the Fail Forward Contest by submitting your failure story today through October 27th, 2017 midnight EDT and your organization will be entered to win a cash bonus prize and promotion on our social media & blog! Sign up here and see submission details below.

“Failure is simply the opportunity to begin again, this time more intelligently.”
– Henry Ford

Congrats to our Fail Forward Winners!

Congrats to our Fail Forward Winners!

October was a month of celebrating failure with our third annual Fail Forward Contest! Throughout the month we witnessed the power of reframing failure as an opportunity to make positive change, and we reflected on the benefits of sharing setbacks with donors, internal teams, and local communities. Most importantly, we had the honor of hearing how all of the 2016 Fail Forward Contest participants proudly failed forward. You blew us away!

We were so inspired by all your fail forward stories and by the resilience, perseverance, and teamwork in your organizations.  This year we had a record number of submissions, and we are excited to introduce you to the 2016 winners and finalists! And the winners of $1000, $600, and $400 are…

2016 Fail Forward Contest

2016 Fail Forward Contest

Ashlee Cox is a current Program Team Fellow and author of this blog post. 

Bill Gates’ first company failed to sell any products, JK Rowling was initially rejected from twelve publishers, a young Amitabh Bachchan was turned down for a job at All India Radio, and staff from 2015 Fail Forward contest winner Sumando Manos Foundation spent four years attempting to find  a solution to malnutrition in a remote Argentinian village.

What do all these success stories have in common? When they failed, they failed forward.

Failure is a word that many of us shy away from, but failing forward is a practice that allows you to examine, share, and critically think about how you can build upon your failures to fuel future success for your organization. As the 2016 Fail Forward Contest approaches, we want to change the way failure is perceived and encourage you to share your Fail Forward stories!

Why Didn’t The Narrative Project Work For Fundraising?

Why Didn’t The Narrative Project Work For Fundraising?

Alison Carlman, GlobalGiving

This is the third article in a three-part series about GlobalGiving’s experiments testing the findings of The Narrative Project. Read the first article here and the second article here.

When the results of our first test of The Narrative Project email appeal started to appear, I hoped they were just a fluke. But soon the numbers grew to statistical significance: the Narrative Project language was performing significantly worse than our control language in terms of dollars raised per email opened.  I suspected it could just be a matter of the particular cause featured in the email appeal, so then we ran tests with entirely different topics.  When that test copy also underperformed the control, I blamed it on my own writing. So in our final test we pitted language from another major nonprofit against phrases pulled directly from the Narrative Project User Guide. The Narrative Project language still failed compared to the control.

At the same time that we were running A/B tests, my GlobalGiving colleague was running experiments with stories in our database. We have more than 50,000 reports written over the past 8 years by nonprofit leaders detailing their progress for their donors. While these emailed reports don’t usually generate a high volume of repeat funding, it was still possible to detect that reports that were highly correlated with Narrative Project Themes generally underperformed other reports in a statistically significant way.

After all of our testing, we could not prove that stories and reports that contain the themes of independence, shared values, partnership, and progress drove any more funding via email and online donations than stories or reports that don’t. In fact, they performed worse.