One Year On: Learning from Feedback After the Earthquake in Nepal

One Year On: Learning from Feedback After the Earthquake in Nepal

Accountability Lab is a recipient of our 2015 Feedback Fund. Recently they shared these insights with us.

In April of 2015, twin earthquakes in Nepal killed over 8,000 people and displaced almost 3 million more. Accountability Lab and Local Interventions Group mobilized our youth networks into what we called Mobile Citizen Helpdesks. These helpdesks of 5 to 10 volunteers worked with communities across the 14 worst affected districts to gather immediate feedback from victims on the relief efforts, and close the loop on the disaster response.

CACE: When the people you serve start wanting something else

CACE: When the people you serve start wanting something else

Center for Amazon Community Ecology (CACE) is a recipient of our 2015 Feedback Fund. Recently they shared these insights with us.

Angelina family artisans 450 pxWe promote conservation and sustainable livelihoods by building stronger communities in the Peruvian Amazon. The Fund allowed us to ask local artisans we work with in the Ampiyacu about their economic realities and dreams. How does making more crafts help them achieve their goals?

In 2015, we sent Peruvian videographer Tulio Davila to talk with 18 artisans over two weeks. He asked about:

  • sources of family income
  • expenses
  • assets
  • education
  • personal and family goals
  • handicraft production

What we learned:

Income range, dependency

We have a better sense of the upper and lower range of income in the village and how important selling crafts is to many families. CACE appears to be the major craft buyer from some artisans but a minor one for others.

Our goals reflect their goals

We had assumed artisans wanted to sell more. We asked them to describe their goals for one year and five years and set personal craft production targets. They showed us how many more crafts our organizations would need to sell if artisans met their goals.

Announcing 100% Matching for Nepal Earthquake Recovery Projects

Announcing 100% Matching for Nepal Earthquake Recovery Projects

At the one year anniversary of major disasters, GlobalGiving supports the fundraising efforts of our partners who are committed to ongoing recovery and rebuilding. On April 25, 2016, GlobalGiving will be matching donations at 100% to projects that have been providing relief after the devastating 9.0 earthquake that hit Nepal last April.

Sign up for the 9:00 am EDT (14:00 pm BST), March 30th webinar to learn more: Registration Link.

The Nepal earthquake anniversary campaign starts on globalgiving.org and globagiving.co.uk on April 25th at 9:00 am EDT (14:00 pm BST), and it will last until funds run out or June 30th, whichever comes first.

Here is the criteria for a donation to get matched (full terms and conditions will be available on the leaderboard when it’s live):

Sarathi: Connecting local needs with local government

Sarathi: Connecting local needs with local government

Sarathi Development Organization is a recipient of our 2015 Feedback Fund. This is a summary of how they close the feedback loop between local people and local governments.

This organization gathers information about what local people need and facilitates its flow from village level to the government in Uttar Pradesh, India. Sarathi begins by mapping out shared community goals over 5 days.

sarathi-model-government-india

The New Donor

The New Donor

My name is Starlyn and I am GlobalGiving’s Champion for Donor Engagement. It’s my job to learn everything there is to know about donors on GlobalGiving and help them make the most out of their giving experience. Last year I attended a conference on millennial giving, MCON, and I wanted to share some of my learnings with you, our nonprofit partner community.

This year’s hottest buzzword in fundraising is “millennials.” I can’t read any crowdfunding blog without hearing about this mysterious group of donors just waiting to be tapped. If you are still confused about what exactly a millennial is and why they matter to your nonprofit, this post is for you.

There is nothing mysterious about millennials. I am a millennial and odds are you know a few yourself. A millennial is someone who was born between the years 1980 and 2000. We grew up with household computers, mobile phones, and ready access to information. We are the most “plugged-in” generation yet but we also had parents that lived through the civil rights era and grew up with a culture of civic engagement. Just because millennials take less time to read articles or posts online doesn’t mean we are shallow or don’t care, it means that we know what we like and how to find it, quickly. Millennials also spend a larger portion of our day interacting with media (Facebook, texting, TV, radio, etc.) than previous generations, 18 hours per day by some estimates!